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by RestonNow.com — July 31, 2017 at 4:00 pm 0

Attention lovers of fried delicacies, farm animal exhibits, midway games and more: It’s time again for the Fairfax County 4-H Fair and Carnival.

The 69th annual fair will kick off at 10 a.m. Thursday and run through Sunday evening at Frying Pan Farm Park (2709 West Ox Road, Herndon). The fun includes the carnival rides and games, a “Big Truck” event at 5 p.m. Friday, the tractor pull at 4 p.m. Saturday, and much more.

Admission to the fair is free. Parking is free Thursday and Friday, and it will be $8 per car Saturday and Sunday.

Advance ride passes are available for $18 through 8 p.m. Tuesday. Passes at the gate will be $25.

The fair is presented by Fairfax County 4-H, which will be presenting entries in 564 categories within 18 departments.

Video courtesy Fairfax County

by Dave Emke — July 31, 2017 at 2:45 pm 16 Comments

Adrian Hollands knew “Orca,” the 20-foot pontoon boat he bought from his Lake Chapel Lane neighbor, is longer than what is allowed on Reston’s lakes per the Reston Deed.

His covenants appeal that was brought before the Reston Association Board of Directors last week (video) failed after a lengthy discussion that delved into conversation about how closely the Board should adhere to the Deed.

“The Deed was written so many years ago that every now and again, we should probably be looking through the Deed and saying, ‘What doesn’t make sense anymore?'” Board President Sherri Hebert said. “[But] it’s not as easy as just taking a vote to change our Deed and change those rules. It’s a pretty complicated process.”

CEO Cate Fulkerson said that in 2003, the section of the Deed regarding boats was considered in advance of the referendum to amend the Deed, which took place in 2006.

“As opposed to eliminating this particular covenant, it was actually strengthened to include the width of the boats,” Fulkerson said. “That was considered and put to community comment.”

Section VI.2(b)(9) of the Reston Deed states that “[e]xcept for emergencies or Association authorized maintenance, no boats greater than eighteen feet in overall length and ten feet in overall width and no boats powered by or equipped with internal combustion engines shall be allowed on the lakes.”

In 2008, seven property owners whose boats were longer than 18 feet were issued nontransferable grandfather exemptions. When Hollands purchased “Orca” from his neighbor, the Covenants Committee said, the exemption for that boat was invalidated.

Hollands, who said the cost of modifying the boat for compliance would be more than $5,000, provided the Board with 36 signed petitions from Lake Audubon neighbors who had no issue with his boat being 20 feet in length. Hollands said while no one seems sure why the Deed sets the limit at 18 feet, he has heard it comes from 18-foot townhouse widths on Lake Anne.

“Suffice it to say that I don’t know how Reston Association or RHOA at the time came up with this rule,” Hollands said in a written comment provided to the Board, “but as with many rules, laws and regulations, they are well intended but not necessarily the right course of action.”

RA member Irwin Flashman addressed the Board and said he feared that if it begins picking and choosing which parts of the Deed to follow and to ignore based on convenience, it would lose all credibility and legal standing.

“If you fail to enforce your covenants, you risk the next time you go to court, having the court say, ‘Oh, but you don’t enforce it yourself and you’re asking the court to do that?” he said. “It would undercut the Reston Association’s authority and this Board’s authority.”

Each Board director spoke on the issue, most agreeing that while Hollands’ plight is unfortunate and he made good points, it is important to abide by the rules set in the Deed and not become a “court.”

“I hate this, because it’s a dumb, arbitrary number,” said At-Large Director Eric Carr. “[But] it would take us down a slippery slope, where when somebody doesn’t want to enforce something, they’re going to say ‘You chose not to enforce this in the past because you thought it was dumb.'”

At-Large Director Ray Wedell, however, said what should be of the most importance to everybody is to “adhere [to] common sense and what’s in the best interest in the community.”

“To say that somehow we have to be the guardians of this strict rule written 50-some-odd years ago on each and every issue or else … is opening us up to incredible bureaucracy,” he said. “I think we use the Deed as a crutch to never do anything sometimes.”

The covenants appeal was denied by a vote of 8-1, with Wedell casting the lone dissenting vote.

“I’m proud to be the one,” he said at the conclusion of the vote.

The Board took legal counsel in executive session to further discuss the process of considering changes to the Deed.

Image via Reston Association

by RestonNow.com — July 31, 2017 at 1:30 pm 32 Comments

This is an op/ed submitted by Terry Maynard, co-chair of the Reston 20/20 committee. It does not reflect the opinions of Reston Now.

Fairfax County’s development strategy of pursuing high-density residential development around Metro stations and other commercial centers (e.g. — Seven Corners, Lake Anne Village Center) will fail in its fundamental goal of generating large new tax revenues. This is due to the demonstrated fact that the cost of community services for residential services substantially exceeds the revenue it generates.

The need for massive new County tax revenues is driven primarily by the deteriorating fiduciary position of its four pension funds (civilian, police, uniformed, and education). At the beginning of the century, all four funds were essentially fully funded (97 percent to 102 percent), but they have deteriorated almost continuously since then. The FY2016 County annual financial report shows a $4.7 billion funding shortfall despite the quadrupling of County (and additional employee) contributions since 2000. That represents about a one-quarter shortfall in required funding across the four funds. This growing shortfall is why Moody’s issued a warning on the County’s AAA bond rating several years ago and the County made a commitment then to reach 90 percent funding by 2025. One obvious approach to addressing such a shortfall is to dramatically increase development that creates new taxable value. From Reston’s perspective, this has taken the form of two County zoning initiatives linked to the revised Reston Master Plan:

  • The passage last year of an amendment to the PDC/PRM (Planned Development Commercial/Planned Residential Mixed-Use) zoning ordinances to increase the allowable density from FAR 3.5 to FAR 5.0. From a Reston perspective, this primarily affects the Herndon-Monroe and Wiehle station areas as well as the southern half of Reston Town Center. The zoning ordinance also covers Commercial Revitalization Areas (CRAs), including Lake Anne Village Center. The two ordinances focus on commercial and residential mixed-use development respectively, and the residential-focused PRM would allow up to as many as 200 dwelling units per acre (DU/AC) at FAR 5.0. No place in the Washington metropolitan area has that much density.  
  • The recently proposed amendment to the Reston PRC (Planned Residential Community) which would increase the community-wide population density from 13 to 16 people per acre, about 21,000 people. More importantly, it places no limits (except Board discretion) on the number of DU/AC in “high density” development areas. This includes the Town Center north of the toll road and Ridge Heights to the south. Making the matter worse, the Reston plan was amended behind closed doors (not by the Reston planning task force) to eliminate any limits on high density multi-family development. Currently, the limit is 50 DU/AC.  

Aside from the many reasons Restonians do not want the intensity of residential development allowed in Reston, there is one vital reason for the County not to want to pursue this ultra high-density residential development strategy: The cost of community services (COCS) for residential development — especially high-density development — exceeds the tax revenues it generates. Residents require schools, streets and other transportation, parks and recreation, libraries, and much more. This is especially important in the ongoing dialogue about increasing residential density in Reston’s PRC zoned area.  

Research on this issue by the US Government, private sector, and academia is extensive and it virtually all comes to this same conclusion. All these studies highlight the importance of methodology, assumptions, other values than tax revenue in development decisions, etc., but none we have discovered suggest that residential development will ever generate a net gain in tax revenues for the County.   

Probably the benchmark study on COCS is an overview by the Farmland Information Center (FIC) of the American Farmland Trust in a public private partnership with the US Department of Agriculture last September. The overview records the results of analysis of the COCS by type of development in more than 150 communities, counties, etc., across dozens of states over more than two decades. The results of FIC’s studies show that, on average, for every dollar in tax revenues generated by tax revenues, the median residential development is a cost $1.16 in community services, a 16 percent loss. By contrast, commercial and industrial development costs $.30 in community services for every $1 generated in tax revenues, a better than three-fold tax revenue return for the County.

(more…)

by RestonNow.com — July 31, 2017 at 11:30 am 0

Lake Anne Plaza will host its first National Night Out block party Tuesday evening, one of several celebrations slated throughout the area.

The goal of National Night Out is to enhance the relationship between neighbors and law enforcement while celebrating a sense of community. Its intent is to provide an opportunity to bring police and neighbors together under positive circumstances.

At Lake Anne Plaza, beginning at 4 p.m., National Night Out events will include kids’ activities, dance crews, a DJ and live music, food specials, a moon bounce, hula demos and more.

Tomorrow will be a beautiful evening for our first ever National Night Out at Lake Anne. Come out and hang with your lakeside community friends and enjoy some fun activities on the Plaza.

Posted by Lake Anne Plaza on Monday, July 31, 2017

For the third straight year, the Hunters Woods Neighborhood Coalition will sponsor a midday National Night Out event, beginning at noon. Several other National Night Out events will take place in Reston, including an evening program at the Southgate Community Center.

In Herndon, National Night Out will be observed from 4:30-8:30 p.m., and HPD will begin by visiting the Harbor House. From there, two motorcades will visit 14 more neighborhoods throughout the town.

“This annual event is one of the highlights of year for the police department and another great opportunity to further enhance the our partnership with the community,” HPD says.

The Fairfax County Police Department will visit as many activities around the county as possible.

National Night Out was first observed in 1984. Thousands of communities across the United States, Canada and worldwide military bases participate in National Night Out each year.

by RestonNow.com Sponsor — July 31, 2017 at 10:15 am 0

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by Dave Emke — July 31, 2017 at 9:00 am 21 Comments

Silver Line Struggling to Maintain Riders — Phase 1 of Metro’s Silver Line expansion fueled an unprecedented building boom in areas adjacent to its five stations, the Washington Post reports. However, the line has struggled to attract riders in the three years since it opened. Only the Wiehle-Metro East station is even close to projected ridership numbers. [Washington Post]

Remembering Bob Simon — In a piece for an English-language Indian newspaper, Manish Nandy remembers the stories Bob Simon told him during daily walks around Lake Anne. [The Statesman]

‘White Liberals Give Themselves Too Much Credit’ — In an opinion piece for an “intersectional feminist” magazine, a Restonian looks back on the death of Nabra Hassanen, saying that hate lives here and everywhere. [Wear Your Voice]

Work Today at Park & Ride — The access road to the Herndon-Monroe Park & Ride will have daytime lane closures for paving from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. today. Drivers should watch for flaggers, who will help direct traffic around the lane closures. [Fairfax County]

Teavana Stores Shutting Down — Starbucks announced last week will close all 379 of its Teavana stores, which it says have been underperforming. This will include the store in Reston Town Center (1826 Library St.). [CNN Money]

Get Ready for Terraset — All rising Terraset kindergarteners are invited to the Terraset playground from 5:30-6:30 p.m. on Wednesdays in August to meet classmates and play on the new Terraset playground. The August kindergarten play dates are sponsored by Terraset Elementary School and Terraset Elementary Parent Teacher Organization (PTO). Representatives from the PTO will be on hand Aug. 2 and Aug. 9 to answer parent questions. No RSVP is required. [Terraset Parent Teacher Organization]

by RestonNow.com — July 28, 2017 at 5:00 pm 0

A new restaurant, a new grocery store and a new tasting room for a popular brewery.

New, new, new.

There has been lots of excitement in the news in recent days, as we’ve been getting some good things to look forward to. Before we look forward too far, though, let’s look back at the week that was.

Here are the stories that have received the most clicks on Reston Now since last Friday:

  1. Cava Mezze Grill To Open Its Reston Location in First Days of August
  2. Lotte Plaza Market Coming to Herndon Center Next Spring
  3. RA Board to Discuss Reston Town Center Parking at Meeting This Week (follow-up story here)
  4. Silver Line Phase 2 Construction Over 60 Percent Complete
  5. Aslin Beer Will Stay in Herndon, Open New Tasting Room on Elden Street

Feel free to discuss these topics and anything else that happened locally this week.

Stay dry, and enjoy the weekend!

by Dave Emke — July 28, 2017 at 4:00 pm 26 Comments

Giving his first full report to the Reston Association Board of Directors (video), treasurer and At-Large director Sridhar Ganesan broke down the figures for the first half of 2017.

Among the figures shared by Ganesan was $16.7 million in year-to-date revenue, 86 percent of which ($14.4 million) is from assessments. That number is up from $16.0 million at the same time last year, a change Ganesan attributed to an increased assessment rate from 2016.

One budget item that isn’t bringing in as much money as expected, Ganesan reported, is the Lake House. The facility has brought in about $80,000 as of the end of June, only slightly more than half of what was projected ($150,000).

“As I understand, it’s really because of scheduling conflicts, in terms of programs versus corporate and other rentals,” Ganesan said. “They’re still working through the scheduling issues, but you are going to see this difference flowing throughout the year.”

The Lake House, purchased by RA in 2015 for $2.65 million, is rented out for activities including weddings, corporate functions, retreats, workshops and conferences.

Lake House expenses as of the end of June have been about $126,000, Ganesan said.

“Part of the reason is going to be that a lot of those costs are on a fixed basis, so you really can’t pull them back even if you’re having some revenue challenges,” he said.

RA CEO Cate Fulkerson said programming changes are being considered for next year.

“The current programming hasn’t changed yet [but] we are reflecting some different programming as we go into 2018,” she said. “So there will be some decision points for the Board there, but we’ve adjusted based on our experience in the first six months.”

Later in Thursday’s meeting, a pair of capital projects advanced.

The Board approved the release $1.35 million in remaining project funds for the Central Services Facility renovation, which had been put on hold last year until the controversial Lake House purchase was independently reviewed. In addition, the Board voted to form a Hook Road Recreation Area working group, which will explore ways to enhance the facility within budget constraints set by the Board.

by RestonNow.com Sponsor — July 28, 2017 at 2:45 pm 1 Comment

In the Design Studio with Anna banner

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You spend most of your day here, from breakfast to dinner and lots of snacks in between. Lately, you don’t like hanging out there that much — something doesn’t seem quite right with the most important room in your house.

Is it time to remodel your kitchen? Here are seven signs that you need to think about getting a fresh start with your favorite room in the house.

  • Tilt cabinets are not a design style! When we talk about open shelving, we don’t mean missing doors or tilted cabinets. Broken and missing cabinets can also be downright hazardous to you and your family. And really, no one wants to see that overflowing spice cabinet every time they walk into the kitchen, reminding you that once upon a time there was a door on this cabinet. Or the drawer that you now have a blue mark from trying to close it to hard and hitting that other side. It’s time to let it go!
  • New found storage? Just kidding — it’s the stove! How many burners are working on your range? Is that a new family sport, waiting to see which burner stops working next? Or maybe you are like my friend (whom I shall not name) who uses her stove for storage since the door is broken, so no cookie for you! Aging appliances are not only a hassle since you can’t properly cook. They usually consume much more energy because they are old, inefficient and most likely work twice as hard as a new appliance.

  • It’s a one-man show! Many of the older kitchen spaces and layout didn’t really consider our modern lifestyle of cooking as a family, spending time with friends and a spot to feed the dog. Most outdated kitchens are enclosed with three, sometimes four, walls and lots of doors. If you must yell at everyone to leave the kitchen while you cook, it’s time to knockdown a wall or two and expand that space to fit your lifestyle.
  • Do you feel like Cinderella? Do you scrub your floor four times a day, or did you just give up? Just like the cabinets, your floors take a daily beating of foot traffic, dropped dishes and spilled food. At some point, no matter what materials they are made of, they will succumb to wear and tear. Floors like hardwood can be refinished, and even patched, if you are changing the layout. Other floors, like tile, will need to be replaced.

  • Turkey time? Not in my house! Do you avoid inviting friends and family because you are embarrassed of your kitchen? Do you they think you can’t cook, when really your oven is broken? It’s time to bring your kitchen up to date so you can enjoy hosting in style and show off your enchilada-making skills.
  • No room for the car! Did you convert the garage to the kitchen storage? Maybe you are a budding master chef or just like kitchen gadgets? We all collect dishes and small appliances over the years. Yes, some may have met their demise and just need to hit the recycling bin, but others you still need and use, but your kitchen has other ideas. If you are like me and believe the crock pot belongs in the kitchen, it’s a sure sign that you need a new kitchen!
  • Never ask a kitchen its age! An old kitchen can bring down your home’s value by simply looking its age. Realtors often say that the kitchen sells the house, and it will help to sell it fast. A successful kitchen remodel is one that you can enjoy for years to come, yet it will look great when the time comes for you to sell. Quality products, a great design and an experienced contractor can make this happen.

How many signs is your kitchen showing? Share your tired kitchen in the comments below.

by Dave Emke — July 28, 2017 at 1:30 pm 0

Actor Evan Helmuth, who lived in Reston until the age of 10, died July 18 in Los Angeles of complications from a stroke.

Helmuth, who attended Lake Anne Elementary School before his family moved to the Midwest, pursued a film career after graduating from Interlochen (Mich.) Arts Academy and from the University of Southern California’s School of Dramatic Arts. His credits included appearances in numerous popular films and television series.

The following information was provided by Helmuth’s family:

Evan Hershey Helmuth passed away in Los Angeles, California on July 18, 2017 of complications from a stroke. Born in 1977, Evan lived in Reston, Virginia until age 10, when he moved with his family to Ames, Iowa. For many summers, he attended the Interlochen Arts Camp in northern Michigan, followed by three years of high school at the year-round Interlochen Arts Academy. He graduated from the Academy in 1995 as a theater major, receiving the school’s highest award for an individual arts graduate. He further pursued his dramatic studies at the University of Southern California School of Dramatic Arts, where he received numerous awards and graduated in 1999 with the prestigious Jack Nicholson Award for outstanding actor. He lived in Los Angeles since that time.

Helmuth’s film credits include the Farrelly Brothers’ Fever Pitch, where he appeared opposite Jimmy Fallon and Drew Barrymore as Fallon’s Red Sox-loving sidekick Troy; William Brent Bell’s 2012 horror movie The Devil Inside as Father David; and Joshua Michael Stern’s 2013 Steve Jobs biopic Jobs starring Ashton Kutcher. His TV credits spanned the likes of ABC’s Alias, CBS’ NCIS, Fox’s Bones, TNT’s Rizzoli & Isles and more recently CBS’ comedic drama Battle Creek.

Evan is remembered as a warm, kind, generous, and talented person by family and friends. He is survived by his sister, Erika Fairchild Helmuth Saunders of Hershey, PA; his stepmother, Paula Forrest of Ames, IA; and his beloved dog Sasha. He was preceded in death by his father John William Helmuth and his mother Kerry O’Brien Helmuth. Memorial contributions can be sent in Evan’s name to the University of Southern California School of Dramatic Arts and the Interlochen Center for the Arts, Theatre Division.

by Dave Emke — July 28, 2017 at 11:30 am 1 Comment

It’s probably not going to be too pleasant outside this weekend.

Heavy rains, possible flooding and cool temperatures are predicted as we are embroiled in a tough midsummer storm. It might be a good weekend to just stay inside and catch up on your Netflix or home projects.

But there’s always a lot of fun to be had in Reston, too. If you still want to get out and find something to do, there are plenty of choices at your disposal. But with the poor weather in the forecast for this weekend, we recommend you check the status of any outdoor event before you trek out.

Below are some of your options if you want to fight Mother Nature and take in some entertainment.

(Editor’s Note: This is just a limited list of all the events taking place in the Reston area this weekend. If you have an event you would like to ensure is listed on the website, be sure to submit it to our Events Calendar.)

  • This weekend, the “Summerbration” series rolls on at Reston Station. Tonight from 7-9 p.m., 3G Musica will perform. Saturday night from 8:30-10:30 p.m., there will be a free screening of “Finding Dory.” The Summerbration events outside the Wiehle-Reston East Metro station will continue through the end of August. (Note: To receive free parking for these events, parking tickets need to be validated by personnel on the plaza. Find the sign that reads “Parking Validation Here.”)
  • Saturday night, Reston Town Center will continue its summer concert series with Love Canon, a bluegrass group, from 7:30-10 p.m. at the pavilion (11900 Market St.). Parking at RTC is free on the weekends.
  • The Reston Farmers Market will take place from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday at Lake Anne Village Center.
  • Lake Anne is also hosting Sunday Yoga on the Plaza each week, at 9:30 a.m.
  • Radcliffe Bailey: The Great Dismal Swamp” remains on display at Greater Reston Arts Center (12001 Market St.) through August.
  • On Sunday from 7-8 p.m., there will be an Art in the Park event at Reston Town Square Park with the Shenandoah Conservatory. Trio D’Anches will perform a virtuosic and energetic concert of woodwind trio works.
  • Saturday morning at 10 a.m., Reston Town Center’s Family Fun Entertainment series will present Blue Sky Puppet Theatre’s Pig Tales. The free event will be at Reston Town Square Park.
  • This is the last weekend for the Reston Community Center’s July exhibit, “Nature’s Allure,” at the Jo Ann Rose Gallery (1609 Washington Plaza N.).
  • Reston Museum (1639 Washington Plaza N.) is hosting its “Reston Stories” exhibit through this month. The Reston Historic Trust and Museum has been collecting residents’ stories and preserving them for future generations. The collection includes stories about volunteering in Reston, the Fountain at Lake Anne Plaza, the early history of Reston and the amazing connections we make in our community.
  • Many restaurants and bars in Reston will have live music this weekend. These include: Vinifera Wine Bar and Bistro (11750 Sunrise Valley Drive) from 7-10 p.m every Friday and Saturday night; Crafthouse (1888 Explorer St.) every Friday and Saturday night from 10 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.; and Tavern64 (1800 Presidents St.) every Friday from 6-10 p.m.
  • Kalyspo’s Sports Tavern (1617 Washington Plaza N.) will have live music from Odell’s Knife tonight from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; Saturday night, DJ Kram will play Top 40 hits.
  • A Grand Night for Singing” is being performed at NextStop Theatre Company (269 Sunset Park Drive, Herndon) tonight at 8 p.m.; Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m.; and Sunday at 2 and 7 p.m. The show is being performed through Aug. 20. Tickets range from $17.50 to $55.
  • Herndon High School Theatre (700 Bennett St.) is presenting “Willy Wonka” tonight and Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; with a 2 p.m. Sunday matinee. Tickets are $12 for each show. Prior to the Sunday show, there will be a “Chocolate Factory Tour” — for a cost of $3 — that will give children a chance to see what goes on behind the scenes of such a production.

File photo

by Dave Emke — July 28, 2017 at 10:15 am 30 Comments

After hearing concerns from the community, including more than 9,000 signatures on a petition about the issue, leaders of Reston Association will attempt to engage Boston Properties in conversation about paid parking at Reston Town Center.

RA’s Board of Directors voted unanimously at their Thursday meeting (video) to authorize CEO Cate Fulkerson, Board President Sherri Hebert and Board Vice President David Bobzien to pursue the talks. Hebert and Bobzien said it is important for RA members to know the Board is actively working toward a solution.

“This is the first step, [and] we think it’s an important step,” said Bobzien, who participated in the meeting by phone. “I think it’s very important that we engage with [Boston Properties].”

Suzanne Zurn, the organizer of the petition and the founder of the Keep Parking Free at RTC movement, addressed the Board during the meeting and encouraged them to take action.

“Your neighbors, your constituents, responded in large numbers to the petition opposing paid parking at RTC,” she said. “I encourage you to read their comments and consider how RA could add weight to their voices in this important community issue.”

Paid parking went into effect Jan. 3 at Reston Town Center, requiring $2-per-hour payment in garages all day Monday through Friday, and $3-per-hour payment for street parking Monday through Saturday. On June 5, parking became free in garages between 5 p.m. and 3:30 a.m., and one hour of free parking is also offered during the day.

Many merchants at RTC validate garage parking for customers, but which of the five garages is validated varies by business. Parking at the Town Center while paid parking is in effect requires the use of the ParkRTC app, though the Town Center announced earlier this week that parking sessions can be started without the app using newly updated kiosks. Parking in the Orange Garage at the Town Center is free for Jackson’s customers, without use of the app or any other method, thanks to an injunction in a lawsuit the business has against Boston Properties.

Zurn said all of the information one must know before visiting the Town Center and parking has only complicated matters and continues to keep potential customers away.

“I don’t know of any paid parking situations in our region that are this complicated,” she said to the Board. “Do you?”

Reston Town Center is not in the jurisdiction of Reston Association. However, Director Victoria White (Hunters Woods/Dogwood District) asked if the parking situation has resulted in disruption to surrounding streets. Zurn said it has, as workers constructing The Signature building at RTC have been seen parking on New Dominion Parkway, Temporary Road and North Shore Drive.

Paul Steidler, who also addressed the Board about the issue, said the Reston Town Center paid parking outrage is hurting the character and direction of the community.

“Are we going to become an area that’s an elitist, gated community with all the decadence that brings?” Steidler said. “Or are we going to go back to our core values of being inclusive of all, of having a place we can all come and go more freely and enjoy what Reston has to offer?”

Hebert said she is hopeful she and the other RA leaders can have productive conversations with Boston Properties and help them understand the community’s plight.

“We feel like we owe that to the folks that live in the Reston Association, to speak on your behalf to them,” she said.

by Dave Emke — July 28, 2017 at 9:00 am 10 Comments

‘Turn Around, Don’t Drown’ — With heavy rains expected today and Saturday, the possibility of flash flooding exists. County officials are reminding residents that cars should not be driven through flooded roadways. [Fairfax County Fire and Rescue]

Police Seek Suspect in Vienna Stabbing — Fairfax County Police have been searching since Thursday morning for the suspect in a stabbing that took place near the Vienna Metro station. The victim suffered non-life-threatening injuries. The suspect is a male of unknown race, about 5 feet 7 inches tall, with a medium build, and a light- to medium-brown complexion. He was wearing a black, hooded shirt pulled over his head. [Fairfax County Police Department]

Deadline for Cardboard Boat Registration Nears — The first Lake Anne Cardboard Boat Regatta is coming up Aug. 12, and the last day to get a boat registered for the event is Tuesday. [Reston Museum]

New Name Coming for J.E.B. Stuart High — By 2019, the Falls Church school named after a Confederate general will have its name changed. The Fairfax County School Board voted last night to make it happen. [NBC Washington]

Connolly: Trump’s Boy Scout Speech Shameful — In a letter to the national president of the Boy Scouts of America, Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) says the BSA should denounce the speech President Trump gave recently at the National Scout Jamboree. Connolly says Trump’s politicized rhetoric “directly contradicted the spirit of Scouting and the tenets of Boy Scout Law.” [The Hill]

Synthetic Soccer Field Coming to Great Falls — The $1.3 million project at Great Falls Nike Park (1089 Utterback Store Road) includes the conversion of an existing grass field to a synthetic turf field, a trail, storm drainage facilities, landscaping, field lighting and related improvements. [Fairfax County Park Authority]

by RestonNow.com — July 28, 2017 at 6:00 am 0

On Fridays, we take a moment to thank our advertisers and sponsors:

Reston Station, Summerbration will offer something to watch, listen to, taste and enjoy all summer long.

Greater Reston Chamber of Commerce, the business community for the vibrant region.

BLVD, Comstock’s apartments at Reston Station.

AKG Design Studio, boutique design firm specializing in kitchen, bathroom designs and cabinetry sales.

Berry & Berry, PLLC, Reston law firm specializing in federal employment, retirement, labor union, and security clearance matters.

Reston Real Estate, Eve Thompson of Long & Foster Real Estate specializes in Reston homes.

Reston Carpet Cleaning, local cleaning service.

Becky’s Pet Care, offering friendly pet services in Northern Virginia.

Reston Community Center, serving Reston’s recreational and cultural needs.

Reston Town Center, offering more than 50 shops, 30 restaurants, an 11-screen cinema and more.

MakeOffices, shared work spaces with five area locations, including Reston.

Boofie O’Gorman, Top Producer Realtor at Long & Foster Reston.

Goldfish Swim School, specializing in children’s swim lessons year-round.

Small Change Consignment, serving Reston’s kids for more than 30 years.

A Cleaning Service, professional residential and commercial cleaning.

Reston Montessori, private co-educational school for children ages 3 months to sixth grade.

Kalypso’s Sports Tavern, providing great food and drink at Lake Anne Plaza.

Bright Horizons at Commerce Metro Center, new child care facility in Reston.

Reston Children’s Center, providing care, preschool and private education and summer camp enrichment.

Ryan Homes — Westmoore, Loudoun County’s hottest new Metro community in the heart of Ashburn.

Knutson Brambleton, Loudoun County urban townhomes with yards in the sky.

Knutson Crescent Place, urban townhomes in Leesburg — Loudoun’s authentic town center since 1758.

Lofts at Village Walk, urban townhome condominium designs at The Village at Leesburg.

Towns of Lansdowne Square, a collection of 23 luxury urban townhomes in downtown Lansdowne.

Tall Oaks Assisted Living, assisted living, memory care and more senior care services.

by Brooke Giles — July 27, 2017 at 4:00 pm 0

The first show of NextStop Theatre Company’s season, “A Grand Night for Singing,” recently opened.

The musical revue, based on the music from Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, takes both the least known and the most popular hits from the playwright duo and gives them new meaning. Rodgers and Hammerstein were the minds behind popular musicals like “The Sound of Music” and “The King and I.”

The show is one of two shows chosen by Evan Hoffmann, producing artist director, to show the “power of catharsis” in theater.

“This season debut is such a fun evening of theatre with remarkably talented singers,” Hoffmann said in a press release. “It fills the theatre space with joy–both from the music and from our patrons. In our ‘Point and Counterpoint’ season, it’s a great match in our ‘catharsis pair’ to the play ‘Disgraced,’ which comes next in September.”

The company has converted their warehouse performance space into a “club-like environment” that opens the setup to be explored and even features a bar on stage.

Led by director Michael J. Bobbitt, the cast and crew include Matthew Hirsh, Karen Vincent, Katherine Riddle, Sarah Anne Sillers and Marquise White. The production team includes Elisa Rosman, Bobby Libby, Jason Arnold, Reid May, Laura Moody and Jessica Dubish.

The theater is located at 269 Sunset Park Drive, Herndon. The show runs until Aug. 20, with performances on Wednesdays through Sundays. Ticket prices change with performance popularity, ranging from $17.50 to $55. Tickets can be purchased online or by calling 866-811-4111.

Pictures courtesy Lock and Company

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