South Lakes HS Student Struck, Killed in Hit and Run

Fairfax County Police are still looking for the driver who killed a Reston teen who was crossing the street Saturday evening.

The victim was identified by police Sunday as 16-year-old Marvin Daniel Cruz Serrano, who friends are remembering as “kind and selfless.” The South Lakes High School student was struck by a vehicle while returning home from work at Reston’s Cafesano, NBC 4 reported.

“At about 5:40, officers responded to the report of a pedestrian hit-and-run crash on South Lakes Drive and Castle Rock Square in Reston,” police said in a press release. “The teen was attempting to cross South Lakes Drive… when he was hit by a vehicle. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

“There is a crosswalk at the intersection and detectives are still conducting their investigation to determine if the teen was using the crosswalk,” police added. Police are now seeking information that can lead them to the driver, who fled the scene.

More from FCPD:

Detectives from our Crash Reconstruction Unit are asking anyone with information on the fatal hit-and-run crash over the weekend to come forward. 16-year-old Marvin Daniel Cruz Serrano of Reston was hit while crossing the street Saturday night, and the driver left the scene. The car involved was likely a sedan based on witness accounts, but we don’t know the model or color. The vehicle would have heavy front-end damage but still be drivable.

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact the Crash Reconstruction Unit witness phone line: 703-280-0543. Tips can also be submitted anonymously through Crime Solvers by visiting http://www. fairfaxcrimesolvers.org, or calling 1-866-411-TIPS (8477). They can also be sent in via text by texting “TIP187” plus the message to CRIMES (274637). Text STOP to 274637 to cancel, or HELP to 274637 for help. Message and data rates may apply. Anonymous tipsters are eligible for cash rewards of $100 to $1000 if their information leads to an arrest.

We are able to share Serrano’s identity publicly, despite him being a juvenile crime victim, because his family provided our detectives their written consent.

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Reston Real Estate: Looking Back and What’s Ahead

This is a sponsored post from Eve Thompson of Reston Real Estate. For a more complete picture of home sales in your neighborhood, contact her on Reston Real Estate.

Reston had a really strong 2018 in real estate. The total volume of transactions will finish at about 1,300 and the average home price was 474,000 a 5% increase over last year.

Inventory of homes for sale has been very low but hasn’t caused any type of panic in the buyers, nor has it embolden the seller to push their list prices up. Days on market are now averaging 40, and about 45% of 2018 transactions included a seller contribution to the buyers closing costs.

Reston continues to be an appealing housing market for many buyers. The metro, the Dulles Tech corridor combined with diverse housing options and great amenities puts Reston on the top of a lot of buyer’s lists.

Here are the numbers for the past 10 years.

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Legal Insider: Ghosting Hits The Employment World

This is a sponsored column by attorneys John Berry and Kimberly Berry of Berry & Berry, PLLC, an employment and labor law firm located in Northern Virginia that specializes in federal employee, security clearance, retirement and private sector employee matters.

By John V. Berry, Esq.

We practice employment law. A new trend that the Federal Reserve and others have picked up on recently is the concept of “ghosting.” Ghosting occurs when a job applicant does not show up for their scheduled interview or where an employee does not show up for scheduled work and never returns.

What is Ghosting?

In areas which range from food services to banking, employers have indicated that a tighter job market and labor shortages have led to applicants deciding not to show up for scheduled interviews without notice or in accepting positions and then not showing up for their first day of work.

In other cases, ghosting has meant that an employee just decides to leave their employment without giving notice (or telling anyone) and just never shows up again. Other reasons for ghosting include the fact that because the employment rate is very low, it is easier than ever to find new employment. One report indicated that 20-50% of employers were facing ghosting in one form or another.

Why is Ghosting Bad for Employees and Applicants?

Ghosting is very bad for applicants and employees on a number of levels.

For starters, it isn’t a good long-term career strategy. If an employee doesn’t provide notice to an employer that they are leaving, supervisors may call the police for a wellness check, leading to a host of issues.

Additionally, by leaving in this manner, employees will most likely be deemed by the employer to have abandoned their employment and then classified as having been terminated. As a result, the employee that “ghosts” away from their employment will be left with a negative mark on their employment records, which they may have to disclose in future employment applications elsewhere and/or if they choose to ever seek a security clearance. This also applies to new employees that are hired but do not show up for their first day of work.

For applicants that don’t show up for interviews, doing so can hurt them in other ways. If a recruiter is involved, that recruiter could list the non-appearance in a shared database with other recruiters, essentially blacklisting the person.

With the digital future upon us, it is only a matter of time before such things also end up in background investigations or reports. The point is that “ghosting” is a recipe for hurting one’s own career.

It is important to take the time to give notice to an employer and make a phone call or at least send an email to an employer if an individual they plan to quit or cannot make a scheduled interview. Furthermore, if an applicant “ghosts” a scheduled interview with an employer, that individual’s name may get around to others in the same field, causing them to lose or not get an interview with other employers.

It may be easier to ignore interviews or leave for better employment, but it is far better to do so with professionalism. Ghosting is simply to big a risk for an employee or applicant to their long term career.

Conclusion

If you are in need of employment law advice or assistance, please contact our office at 703-668-0070 or through our contact page to schedule a consultation. Please also visit and like us on Facebook or Twitter.

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