Learn How Reston Defined Itself through Vintage Advertising

Reston received a lot of press attention back during its initial development stages, but what really helped attract people to live and work in Reston was the marketing, said local graphic designer Chris Rooney.

The Reston-centric advertisements of yore primarily ran in The Washington Post and the now-defunct Washington Evening Star.

“These ads first appeared at the genesis of Reston when it was being developed,” said Rooney. “Without these ads, I don’t think that Reston would become what it is today, attracting people here today and making it what it is now.”

Rooney will conduct an event at the Reston Community Center next Thursday (May 10) at 7 p.m., entitled “Reston Hears Voices: The Marketing of a New Town.” The event will focus on how the town defined itself through marketing and advertising from the early 1960s through the first 10 years of Reston’s existence.

Over 70 newspaper advertisements have been collected for the event, all spanning the time from when construction on Reston’s first village center started to when the town reached a population of 10,000.

The event will probably offer “things that the audience hasn’t really seen before,” said Alexandra Campbell, the Reston Historic Trust’s executive director. “So that certainly will be a nice aspect to it.”

Photo via the Reston Historic Trust

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Del. Ken Plum: Challenges To An American Ideal

This is a commentary from Del. Ken Plum (D-Fairfax), who represents Reston in Virginia’s House of Delegates. It does not reflect the opinion of Reston Now.

“The current landscape of the nation has been darkened by storm clouds of hate speech, white nationalist ideology, bias-motivated violence, and rising intolerance,” according to a report of the Inclusive America Project entitled Pluralism in Peril: Challenges to an American Ideal (Aspen Institute, 2018) sponsored by the Aspen Institute Justice and Society Program.

Recently, I had the pleasure of interviewing Meryl Justin Chertoff, Executive Director of The Aspen Institute Justice and Society Program, and to participate in a roundtable discussion of this issue at the All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Center in Sterling. The interview can be found here.

Pluralism refers to the right of all Americans to practice their faith in freedom and security. As indicated from the quote of the Aspen Report in the opening sentence of this column, there are attacks on religious freedom from many directions and in many forms in recent years. Some even question the meaning of religious freedom in our country suggesting that they should have freedom of their religion–most often Christian religion–and not all those other practices that other people want to call religion. After all, the most extreme argue that this country was founded on a belief in God, meaning of course god as they define him or her in their religious beliefs.

A basic problem in defending American pluralism seems to me to be the ignorance on the part of some of basic constitutional protections and how they were secured. Virginia was settled as a land venture by investors who were looking for a way to make money in a colonial empire. First settlers were part of the state church of England as Anglicans or they had no religion at all. As more settlers arrived the minority religions such as Baptists started to arrive, and they objected to having part of their tax money go to the church. Religious conflict occurred as more settlers recognized an opportunity to free themselves from a state-imposed religion.

Soon after Thomas Jefferson penned the Declaration of Independence, he wrote what became known as the Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom, the most important piece of legislation ever passed in the Virginia legislature and I believe in any legislative body. Just as the Declaration had declared political and economic freedom from the mother country, the Statute of Religious Freedom in one sentence of more than 700 words declared in part that “no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place, or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief, but that all men shall be free to profess and by argument to maintain, their opinion in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge or affect their civil capacities.”

The challenges to our pluralism must be countered by our unwavering support of our own beliefs as well as the right of others to their own religious beliefs. As the report on pluralism found, “this work requires decency, sympathy, appreciative curiosity about difference, and concern for our shared beliefs.”

File photo

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Air Quality Alert Issued For Reston, Washington Metro Region

A National Weather Service code orange air quality alert has been issued for the Washington Metro region, including Reston.

The alert states that “air pollution concentrations within the region may become unhealthy for sensitive groups.” That includes children, asthma sufferers, the elderly, and those with heart and lung conditions.

Anyone outside of those groups are unlikely to experience any side effects.

For the sensitive groups, however, staying inside and avoiding exertion are the best ways to avoid air pollution effects, according to the alert.

A code orange is not an indication of the worst air quality. The color alert scale ranges from, in order of least to most harmful, green, yellow, orange, red, purple, and maroon.

The AQI, or air quality indicator, ranges from 0-500. Maroon would indicate the highest, most hazardous health concern, with an AQI of 301-500. The alert today (May 2), a code orange, indicates an AQI of 101-150.

Photo courtesy of Ryan Goff

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Wednesday Deals & Events in Reston

Every weekday, we highlight deals and events around Reston, with help from Tim’s Reston Directory (www.TIMS.US). Some require a coupon or have more instructions, so be sure to click the link for details and any additional requirements.

​​​​Food & Drink

Fun & Events

Follow Tim’s Reston Directory on Twitter and Facebook and visit TIMS.US for a comprehensive monthly calendar of deals and events around Reston.

Interested in special promotion as the deal or event of the day? Have a deal or event tip? Like what you see and want to make a comment? Want to make a suggestion? Email Tim at [email protected]!

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Japanese Creperie J-Petal Opened This Weekend

Japanese creperie J-Petal opened this Saturday, according to Jean Lin, the manager of the Harrisonburg, Va. location, who spoke with Reston Now on Friday.

The Hunters Woods Village Center location, at 2260 Hunters Woods Plaza, will be the fourth Virginia location for the small chain.

According to the creperie’s website, there will be fourteen total stores with the new addition.

Both sweet and savory crepe options are on the chain’s menu.

Customers can have their choice of anything from a chicken to a “fruit martini” crepe.

J-Petal also offers Thai ice cream, a rolled up variation of the global dessert.

Photo courtesy of Twitter/Prashant

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Monday Morning Notes

(Updated 1:36 p.m. to remove an event that has already passed)

Warming up to solar? – Fairfax County is holding a free information session today, and will be offering real estate tax credits, solar energy systems discounts, and more to home and business owners. (WTOP)

The throwback comments section – A Reston resident had their Letter To The Editor published in The Washington Post. The topic? The split between Reston and the rest of Fairfax County about density and proposed growth. (The Washington Post)

That’s a lot of butts – Reston business Waitbusters hit 50,000 customers seated since launching their software about a year ago. (Restaurant News)

Everyone’s a critic – A theater review of Reston Community Player’s Thoroughly Modern Millie. Sounds like it was a good time. (Maryland Theatre Guide)

We’re taking a hiatus – Our morning newsletter will be taking a break through May 10, as the editor is away. ARLnow’s assistant managing editor, Bridget Reed Morawski, will be stepping in to cover Reston.

The photo in the morning newsletter was provided with a caption that it is a Great Blue Heron. Another reader has chimed in to say that it is actually a Great Green Heron. Additionally, the Reston editor will be returning May 10, not May 8.

Photo courtesy of Flickr user vantagehill.

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Eight Candidates Sought For RCA June Election

The Reston Citizens Association is seeking candidates for the eight open district and at-large seats for its 13 member Board of Directors.

That’s over 60 percent of the total board.

Four At-Large Director seats are up for grabs, each for a three-year term.

The Town Center/Lake Anne/Tall Oaks District Director position is open for a three-year term and the South Lakes District Director seat is up for a two-year term.

Two open North Point Director positions are also seeking candidates, with one- and two-year terms respectively .

To run in the election from June 7-22, Reston residents are required to file candidate forms by May 30.

A press release from the RCA stated that “to run for a director seat, you must live in Small Tax District 5, be a Reston resident 18 years or older, and vote in designated precincts/polling places within Reston districts.’

Applications are available online and must be emailed by May 30 to [email protected]

File photo

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Expect Long Rides On Metro This Weekend

Metro rail service will be interrupted by single tracking and rail readjustment maintenance work this weekend.

Expect Orange and Silver Line Metro trains to operate approximately every 24 minutes, according to WMATA.

Silver Line trains, however, will only operate between Wiehle Reston East and Ballston-MU Metro stations. Anyone trying to travel further along the line should transfer to the Orange or Blue lines.

However, the Orange and Blue lines will both be single tracking between Eastern Market and Stadium Armory Metro stations for maintenance.

File photo

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