Herndon passed an ordinance on Jan. 25, 2022 that restricts how close vehicles can park to driveways. (Courtesy Town of Herndon)

Following longstanding and growing complaints over parking issues, Town kf Herndon officials adopted an ordinance yesterday (Tuesday) to restrict how close drivers could park to driveways, one of several changes to overhaul parking rules.

“This is the number one issue in the town of Herndon,” Councilmember Pradip Dhakal said of parking problems, referring to commercial vehicles parking in the town as well as vehicles with expired tags.

The changes, approved by Herndon Town Council, go into effect immediately. Among the new rules, the ordinance:

  • bans various vehicles — such as those weighing more than 12,000 pounds or being longer than 21 feet — from parking in residential areas for more than two hours at a time
  • restricts recreational vehicles from temporarily parking longer than 72 hours on a residential street
  • allows the town to impose $50 fines on motorists who block curb ramps; it also allows officials to fine drivers $50 if they park within 5 feet of a driveway

Herndon police had recommended restricting parking within 10 feet of a driveway, but council revised a proposed ordinance following a public hearing. Previously, the town could only fine vehicles $50 if a vehicle blocked access to a driveway.

Police Chief Maggie DeBoard said people recognized how Herndon’s parking was considerably less restrictive than neighboring Fairfax and Loudoun counties. She said one person defiantly challenged the town’s parking enforcement officer regarding how close a vehicle could be to a driveway.

DeBoard said last week during a work session that the town’s first approach is educating drivers before issuing tickets.

During the public hearing, homeowner Pat Voltmer of Missouri Avenue said she and neighbors have been filing weekly complaints since August due to large six- to 10-wheel vehicles taking up overflow parking on streets. The parking problems also made turning around on streets difficult and dangerous for service trucks, she said.

Residents also had voiced a safety issue over limited visibility when leaving driveways due to jam-packed streets, and frustrations also came from parked vehicles interfering with trash pickup.

“It makes me feel that now is the time to act. Probably before was the time to act,” Councilmember Sean Regan said.

Council members suggested further parking issues could be explored, such as adding more stop signs in the town.

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A portion of Edmund Halley Drive has officially been transferred over to the state.

At a Tuesday meeting, the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors unanimously voted to transfer a section of the road to the Secondary System of State Highways, a move made in preparation of the completion of phase two of the Silver Line.

The move — which was stipulated in proffer agreements for the Reston Crossing project — allows the state to have unrestricted right-of-way along the road.

The formerly private street was improved with bike lanes, a trail, and a sidewalk in order to meet requirements in the Fairfax County Comprehensive Plan.

The street was also widened to meet requirements set by the Virginia Department of Transportation.

The street will connect to the Reston Town Center Metro Station from Sunrise Valley Drive.

New York-based company Tishman Speyer is developing Reston Crossing, a two-million-square development south of the Dulles Toll Road between Edmund Halley Drive and Reston Parkway.

The project was approved in 2019.

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(Staff Photo by Jay Westcott)

Fairfax County supervisors have approved using I-66 toll money for bus projects servicing Reston, one of which involves creating a new bus route.

The commuting programs will create a route from the Reston South Park and Ride to key destinations in Arlington County and reduce fares for the Fairfax Connector Route 599 from $7.50 to $4.25.

Supervisors approved the efforts during a public meeting yesterday (Tuesday), following transit officials’ approvals last year.

Like Route 599, the new service will go to the Pentagon, Pentagon City and Crystal City. It’ll involve 10 morning and 10 evening express routes for a period of two years.

The $5.1 million in funding awarded for that project mostly covers the costs of acquiring six new buses, eyed for purchase in 2023.

A county document suggested that the fare reduction could start in the fall of 2022, with $154,500 in funding lasting through Sept. 30, 2025.

The money for the projects comes through the Commuter Choice program, which seeks to improve transportation in the I-66 corridor, with the Northern Virginia Transportation Commission and Commonwealth Transportation Board deciding last year to award the money to Fairfax County for the projects.

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An event that is a staple for Restonians — the Reston Triathlon — is officially coming to an end.

The Reston Triathlon Association formed in 1983 and organized the event on the second Sunday of each September.

In an online post, the organization’s Board of Directors said that it was not able to find another organization to take over and continue the race.

“Unfortunately, we were just not able to overcome the mounting financial and logistical challenges we experienced these past few years to host a race that the community has come to know and love,” the statement read.

The nonprofit organization, which is staffed entirely by volunteers, canceled last year’s event due to the pandemic.

For years, participants have taken part in a race of Olympic proportions. The event was organized into into a 1500-meter swim, a 25-mile bike ride, and a 6.2-mile run.

Here’s more from the board on the change:

We have had an incredible journey with all of you, our racers, your supporters, our volunteers and all of the leaders in the community. We are very thankful for the memories and many years of racing. We will miss all of you. 

The Reston Triathlon is a non-profit organization.  Once we close out our expenses,  any remaining funds will be donated to local charities.

Thank you for the many years of support.  Stay healthy, volunteer and support your community events!

Photo via Reston Triathlon/Facebook

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Morning Notes

Business Burglarized in Herndon — Local police are looking for a man who may have robbed a business on the 700 block of Elden Street on Jan. 18. Police recently released a video of the subject. [Herndon Police Department]

Bingo Activity Results in Backlash — A high school lesson plan that included an activity called Privilege Bingo has resulted in backlash against the Fairfax County Public Schools system. The activity marked several demographics as privileged. [Local DVM]

Reston Athlete Competes for Olympic Gold — Maame Biney is gearing up for this year’s Olympics in Beijing. The Restonian is the first black woman to compete on a U.S. short track speed skating team. [Northern Virginia Magazine]

Photo by Terry Barans

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A Reston Association committee is pushing for the renovation of Shadowood Recreation Area, an aging facility with a 20-meter pool that has been closed for more than two years.

The Parks and Recreation Advisory Committee is formally recommending that RA reopen the pool after completing renovations that will boost pool usage.

“Top amenities for increased enjoyment especially include lengthening of the pool to provide for standard lap lanes,” committee chair Julie Bitzer wrote in a Jan. 9 memo.

The committee is also suggesting other additions like slides, a play area, bigger bathrooms and a hot tub. Other recommendations include improving the appearance of the pool, maintaining comfortable water temperature in the pool and on the deck side, and renaming the facility from Shadowood to South Lakes.

The committee also cautioned that future investment in all RA pools should be considered in concert with the whole facility, not just the pool, and with a specific eye toward enhancing the “desirability” of RA’s facilities.

RA’s Board of Directors is expected tot discuss the issue at a meeting this Thursday.

Recommendations were made after RA completed a community survey and launched a public feedback period last year.

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A proposal to potentially add up to 90 townhomes near Hidden Creek Country Club is up for a planning committee vote tonight, a decision that will serve as a key indicator for how Fairfax County officials handle the project.

The Reston Planning and Zoning Committee, an advisory group to the Fairfax County Planning Commission and Board of Supervisors, is slated to vote at the 7:30 p.m. virtual meeting on the 28-acre project at 11600 American Dream Way.

The property owner — an affiliate of Connecticut investment firm Wheelock Street Capital — has been making adjustments on the project in response to meeting with the committee and public. It purchased the property from Fannie Mae in 2018 for over $95 million.

Scott Adams, an attorney with McGuireWoods, presented in November before the Reston Planning and Zoning Committee. Changes include 9.28 acres that will be publicly accessible open space and repositioning gates on American Dream Way to only restrict access to the existing office compound.

“[Thoughtful], high quality site design is proposed to create a development that will further the Comprehensive Plan goals of mixed use development, significant park spaces, trail, and public art,” Adams previously wrote in a November 2020 statement seeking to justify the project.

The law firm hosted meetings in December and January with community members, too, but residents are still voicing concerns.

An affiliate of the investment firm, Wheelock Communities, acquired Hidden Creek Country Club in 2017 for $14 million and has sought to convert the golf course into a residential community. Residents have voiced their opposition, with Hunter Mill District Supervisor Walter Alcorn backing their views on keeping the course, suggesting that public officials wouldn’t allow that kind of development there.

Even with the Fannie Mae redevelopment changes, the project conflicts with the Reston Comprehensive Plan as well as the character of the community, according to Reston Citizens Association President Lynne Mulston, who noted the association was merely acting as a messenger for nearby residents’ concerns. (The county is still studying the possible comprehensive plan amendment.)

Ninety townhomes is just too much,” Mulston said, noting how residents have sought to scale back the project. “It’s just way out of whack.”

Earlier, residents raised concerns about how the project could affect northern neighbors’ access to American Plaza Shopping Center, providing access to Whole Foods groceries and other amenities. Fannie Mae previously worked with Reston Association to create a sidewalk in the area, Mulston said.

“As with any rezoning in Reston I encourage the applicant to work with County staff, concerned members of the community, and Reston P&Z to address issues raised before the application goes to public hearing before the County Planning Commission, currently scheduled for March 9,” Alcorn said in a statement.

The project would still keep the option to create two office buildings, a previously approved use, officials have noted. The former Fannie Mae office building is slated to remain.

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Irving Middle School students wear face masks in class (via FCPS)

Updated at 11:50 a.m. — The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors voted 8-1 this morning to support the continued mask requirement in schools and approved a letter directing Virginia to work with local health and school officials on metrics for making masks optional.

Earlier: When students across Fairfax County returned to classrooms today (Tuesday), they came wearing the most contentious, must-have accessory of the school year: face masks.

While the devices have become the subject of fierce political debate, Fairfax County Public Schools officials say that tension has not carried over into school buildings, where they have encountered few issues with getting students and staff to wear masks.

Just 40 out of the division’s nearly 180,000 students have been cited for not wearing a mask since the requirement took effect on Aug. 20, FCPS Assistant Superintendent of Special Services Michelle Boyd said at a virtual town hall meeting last night (Monday).

“Certainly, students have had to be reminded to pull your face mask up and potentially to wear it appropriately, as we all have to have reminders,” Boyd said. “But by and large, we want to celebrate that FCPS students have stepped up and answered the call to keep themselves safe, to keep their friends safe, and to keep their community safe.”

Officials say the mask-wearing requirement, combined with vaccinations, testing, and other mitigation protocols, has proven effective so far at limiting the spread of COVID-19 in schools.

Fairfax County Public Schools says nearly all students have complied with its face mask requirement (via FCPS/Facebook)

As of today, FCPS students, staff, and visitors have reported 6,362 Covid cases since August, including 2,681 cases this month — double the 1,317 cases seen in December.

Boyd noted that the number of cases still represents just a fraction of the district’s 206,111 students and staff, and while there have been 36 outbreaks reported, consisting of 155 cases, there have not been any since students returned from winter break on Jan. 10.

Unlike some other school systems in the area, FCPS has not reverted any schools to virtual learning due to Covid.

Still, with the school system seeing more cases than ever and community transmission levels high, albeit declining, Superintendent Scott Brabrand says FCPS needs to “stay the course” and maintain its current health and safety practices.

“We all seek a moment when we can go to creating mask-optional conditions, but now is not the time at the greatest surge we’ve ever had in the pandemic,” Brabrand said, stating later that FCPS is working with health officials to establish metrics for when to roll back masking and other requirements.

Whether FCPS will be allowed to continue with universal masking, however, is up to the courts after the county school board joined six other localities in filing a lawsuit yesterday to prevent Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s executive order directing schools to make masks optional from taking effect.

The complaint argues that the governor lacks the authority to issue and enforce the executive order, which it says violates the state Constitution and the state law adopted last year that requires schools to provide in-person instruction in accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention mitigation strategies.

“We’re not here out of a desire, but rather, out of a need to ensure that we’ve got that separation of powers and we maintain our constitutional authority as locally elected school board members who answer and are ultimately accountable to our constituents,” Fairfax County School Board Chair Stella Pekarsky told FFXnow in an interview.

She declined to speculate on what would happen if the Arlington Circuit Court, where the lawsuit was filed, rules in favor of Youngkin but said the school board is confident it will prevail in the case.

Youngkin spokesperson Macaulay Porter said the governor’s office is “disappointed that these school boards are ignoring parents’ rights.”

“The governor and attorney general are in coordination and are committed to aggressively defending parents’ fundamental right to make decisions with regard to their child’s upbringing, education, and care, as the legal process plays out,” she said in a statement.

Virginia’s health and education departments released new guidelines on Friday (Jan. 21) to support Youngkin’s executive order, urging testing and vaccinations while suggesting mask-wearing should be a personal choice.

“There is presently a lack of consensus among health experts regarding the costs and benefits of mask-wearing for children in school,” the guidance says, stating that the N95 and KN95 masks recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are “very tight and uncomfortable.”

However, local health officials disputed the assertion that there’s a lack of consensus on the benefits of masks in preventing COVID-19 transmission at last night’s town hall, noting that universal masking is still recommended by the CDC and the Fairfax County Health Department.

“The FCHD continues to highlight the benefits of masking and encourages masks as an important part of an overall layered prevention strategy,” the county health department said by email. “We are aware of the updated VDH guidance issued this weekend and are in the process of ensuring that our COVID 19 investigations and containment practices are aligned.”

Dr. Benjamin Schwartz, the county’s director of epidemiology and population health, and Dr. Russell Libby, a local pediatrician who founded the Virginia Pediatric Group, agreed that “the vast majority of evidence” suggests masks work and are most effective when worn by everyone.

“There are many variabilities relative to the materials, the fashion with which they are fitted, and the cooperation on a continuing basis in those settings,” Libby said. “…There’s a lot that’s evolving, but the best advice that can be given is that still masks are the way to go, that they help significantly reduce the likelihood of transmission.”

Community members shared a variety of perspectives on FCPS’ mask requirement, with some parents expressing frustration with the lack of choice and others thanking school officials for following federal and local health guidelines.

Brabrand described the mask mandate as part of a balancing act between individual rights and collective responsibility and sacrifice.

“I have the right to do things up until that right infringes on the rights of others,” he said. “The pandemic is really just a primary example of how my decision not to wear a mask or not to get vaccinated has a huge effect on others. I think that’s why it remains an issue that creates so much comment and commentary.”

Photo via FCPS

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Planning for new arts center at Reston Next begins

The county is officially courting feedback on the feasibility of a proposed arts center at Boston Properties’ Reston Next development.

Proffers negotiated by the county and the developer call for a 60,000-square-foot arts center and performing arts venue at the development.

Public meetings are planned from February through April to review the feasibility of the project. Architecture firm Grimm + Parker plans to review feedback and determine an estimate cost for the center.

“Community members, arts organizations and educators should plan to attend a session aligned with their perspective and give input regarding community needs and expectations for the facility space elements and functions,” Reston Community Center wrote in a Jan. 24 announcement about the public engagement period.

A breakdown of the meeting schedule is below:

Monday, February 14, 2022, 6:30 p.m. Kickoff Meeting. RCC Hunters Woods.

Monday, February 28, 2022, 6:30 p.m. Focus Group: Performing Arts. RCC Hunters Woods.

Monday, March 14, 2022, 6:30 p.m. Focus Group: Visual Arts. RCC Hunters Woods.

Monday, March 28, 2022, 6:30 p.m. Focus Group: Arts Education, Schools, Equity/Opportunity Neighborhoods. Zoom platform.

Monday, April 4, 2022, 6:30 p.m. General Wrap-up. Zoom platform.

Participants should RSVP by emailing [email protected]

Reston Next, formerly known as Reston Gateway, is located next to the Reston Town Center Metro Station. The development will be anchored by Volkswagen Group of America and Fannie Mae.

The arts center was part of a proffer agreement approved by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors in 2018. Block J, which is near the intersection of Sunset Hills Road and Town Center Parkway, is expected to house the facility.

A feasibility study must be completed by the summer of 2022.

Image via handout/Fairfax County Government

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Morning Notes

Help Sought in Identifying Person of Interest — The Herndon Police Department is asking the public’s help to identify a person of interest in a robbery that happened on Jan. 18. The individual is seen entering and exiting an elevator in the business. [HPD]

Metro Kicks Off Budget Talks — Metro is seeking comments on its budget for fiscal year 2023. The budget takes into account the launch of six new Silver Line Stations. [Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority]

County Districts Could Get New Names — The Lee, Mason, Mount Vernon, Springfield and Sully districts could get new names. The county’s redistricting committee meets today to discuss possible name changes. [Fairfax County Government]

Search for Boat Owner Continues — Reston Association is looking for the owner of a Malibu boat that was found at Lake Anne. The organization has been stepping up efforts to manage abandoned boats in the area in recent months. [RA]

Photo by Marjorie Copson

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Pedestrian path route (Via Fairfax County)

A project to improve access from neighborhoods to the yet-to-open Innovation Center Metro station could begin in the summer of 2024 and be completed a year later.

That’s what Sonia Shahnaj, a project manager for the Fairfax County Department of Transportation, told community members last week during an online meeting about the project, which will create a pedestrian path from Farougi Court and Apgar Place to a kiss-and-ride parking lot, wrapping around a green space used for cricket.

“Creating walkable and bikeable access to transit stations is really critical from a transportation standpoint, from a quality of life standpoint and from an environmental standpoint, so this is a big deal,” Dranesville District Supervisor John Foust said at the meeting.

The project will create an approximately 2,000-foot-long path that’s 10-feet wide. It’ll be 14-feet wide for two bridges that cross Horsepen Creek, one that’s 367 feet long and another that’s 135 feet long. Lighting will be there, too.

Easements will shave off some of the green space to make way for the trail.

Updates on the project are listed on a county web page, and comments related to the meeting can be submitted to FCDOT by Feb. 4, 2022.

An extension of the Metrorail from Ashburn to Reston, including a connection to the Dulles airport, is delayed but could open this year.

Nearby, a development project called Rivana at Innovation Station would create a residential-office-retail complex on a 103-acre space with up to 2,719 dwelling units.

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With a second week of consistently declining cases, Fairfax County’s current, omicron variant-fueled Covid wave has receded closer to the levels seen last winter.

The Fairfax Health District, including the cities of Fairfax and Falls Church, reported 607 new cases today (Monday). With 845 cases added yesterday (Sunday), it’s the first time since Dec. 20 and 21 that there have been fewer than 1,000 new cases on consecutive days.

The county is now averaging 1,150 cases per day for the past week — less than half the weekly average of 2,520 cases recorded on Jan. 13, when the pandemic’s latest surge appears to have peaked.

Last winter, the seven-day average peaked at 697 cases on Jan. 17, 2021.

The omicron surge’s decline can also be seen in the district’s testing positivity rate, which has dropped from 34.1% on Jan. 10 to 23.1%, as of last Thursday (Jan. 20). The seven-day average for hospitalizations has gone from 5.7 on Jan. 15 to 3.1 today, when four new hospitalizations were reported.

In total, the Fairfax Health District has recorded 164,209 COVID-19 cases, 4,400 hospitalizations, and 1,272 deaths, five of them in the past week.

Fairfax County COVID-19 cases over the past 180 days, as of Jan. 24, 2022 (via VDH)
All Fairfax County COVID-19 cases as of Jan. 24, 2022 (via VDH)

According to Fairfax County Health Department data, 840,040 residents overall — or 71% of the population — are fully vaccinated against Covid, including 80% of residents 18 and older.

The 949,105 residents, or 82% of the population, who have gotten at least one vaccine dose include:

  • 89.7% of adults
  • 94.9% of 16 to 17 year olds
  • 90.4% of 12-15 year olds
  • 47.6% of 5-11 year olds

In addition, 34.9% of Fairfax County residents, including 43.5% of adults, have gotten a booster shot or third dose, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

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Reston Community Center Hunters Woods (staff photo by David Taube)

The weekly planner is a roundup of interesting events over the next week in the Herndon and Reston area.

We’ve searched the web for events of note. Want to submit a listing? Submit your pitch here!

Monday, Jan. 24

  • Ice Skating — 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. at Reston Town Center — Students have the day off amid a professional development day for staff, but the ice skating pavilion will be open. Admission starts at $9 for seniors, military members and kids ages 12 and under.

Tuesday, Jan. 25

  • Hooray for Horses — 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Loudoun Heritage Farm Museum — Learn about horses, from breeds of work horses to grooming, and get a home activity bag. Cost is $5.

Wednesday, Jan. 26

  • Senior Movie Day — 10 a.m. at Bow Tie Cinemas at Reston Town Center — This special showing to audiences ages 55 and up presents the World War II film “Midway.” Doors open at 9:15 a.m. No registration required. Free.

Thursday, Jan. 27

  • An Evening with Branford Marsalis — 8 p.m. at The Barns — The Branford Marsalis Quarter, led by a saxophonist from the Marsalis jazz family, performs at Wolf Trap. Tickets start at $68, and doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Friday. Jan. 28

Saturday, Jan. 29

  • Reston Summer Camp Expo — 9 a.m. to noon at Reston Community Center Hunters Woods — Learn about Reston-area camps, win door prizes and enjoy hands-on games and crafts. Free.
  • Celebrate Lunar New Year with a Lion Dance Performance — Noon to 12:30 p.m. at Herndon Fortnightly Library — The Jow Ga Shaolin Institute, a traditional Chinese martial arts in Herndon, performs this tradition to bring good fortune in the new year.

Sunday, Jan. 30

  • Dino and Dragon Stroll — 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Dulles Expo Center — The final day of a weekend event featuring colossal animated dinosaurs and dragons. Cost is $21.99.
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(Updated at 5:25 p.m.) Fairfax County Public Schools and six other school divisions, most of them in Northern Virginia, have sued to stop Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s order that makes face masks optional in schools.

As first reported by The Washington Post, the lawsuit was filed in Arlington Circuit Court this morning (Monday), asking the court for an injunction to stop Youngkin’s order from being enforced.

FCPS was joined by the school boards of Alexandria City, Arlington County, City of Richmond, Falls Church City, Hampton City, and Prince William County.

Collectively representing more than 350,000 students, the jurisdictions have all promised to continue requiring masks for students and staff, defying the executive order that Youngkin issued on Jan. 15, his first day in office, and was set to take effect today.

“The question for this Court is whether, by executive order, a governor can override both the Constitution of Virginia and a law enacted by the General Assembly,” the complaint says. “The School Boards respectfully submit that the answer to this question is no.”

In a joint statement, the suing school divisions say they’re seeking to defend “the right of school boards
to enact policy at the local level, including policies that protect the health and well-being of all students and staff”:

This legal action centers on fundamental questions about the framework of public education in Virginia, as set out in the Virginia Constitution and by the General Assembly. At issue is whether locally elected school boards have the exclusive authority and responsibility conferred upon them by Article VIII, § 7 of the Constitution of Virginia over supervision of the public schools in their respective communities, or whether an executive order can unilaterally override that constitutional authority.

Also at issue is whether a governor can, through executive order, without legislative action by the Virginia General Assembly, reverse a lawfully-adopted statute. In this case, Senate Bill 1303, adopted with the goal of returning students to safe in-person instruction five days a week in March 2021 and still legally in effect, provides that local school boards should follow The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) health and safety requirements.

Without today’s action, school boards are placed in a legally untenable position — faced with an executive order that is in conflict with the constitution and state law. Today’s action is not politically motivated. These seven school divisions would welcome the opportunity to collaborate with the governor to ensure the safety and welfare of all students.

This lawsuit is not brought out of choice, but out of necessity.

With COVID-19 transmission rates high, our hospitals at crisis level, and the continued recommendation of health experts to retain universal mask-wearing for the time being, this is simply not the time to remove this critical component of layered health and safety mitigation strategies. School divisions need to continue to preserve their authority to protect and serve all our students, including our most vulnerable, who need these mitigation measures perhaps more than anyone to be able to continue to access in-person instruction.

FCPS Superintendent Scott Brabrand reaffirmed the division’s commitment to maintaining a mask requirement due to the spread of COVID-19 in a message to the community on Friday (Jan. 21), citing state law and a regulation that made masks part of the dress code, as of Aug. 20.

“We are working towards a day when we can begin to roll back these safety measures, including universal masking,” Brabrand said. “But for right now, we must continue to protect and serve all our students, including our most vulnerable. More than anything else, these mitigation measures allow them to safely remain in our schools.”

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Morning Notes

Driver Charged in Crash that Killed Reston Woman — Police have charged a Manassas man with driving under the influence and involuntary manslaughter in connection with a car crash that killed a Reston woman. [Fairfax County Police Department]

Lake Anne Visioning Plan Broadens — The county is considering a plan to dedicate $250,000 for a long-term visioning plan for the Lake Anne area. [Reston Patch]

Schools to Maintain Mask Requirement — Despite Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s order to lift mask mandates in schools, the Fairfax County Public Schools will maintain mask requirements for students. Virtual town halls to discuss the issue are planned for this week. [FCPS]

Police Investigate Gas Station Robbery — Local police are investigating a robbery that happened at Sunoco Gas Station at 13470 Coppermine Road on Jan. 19. A man displayed a gun and demanded property, according to police. [FCPD]

Photo by Marjorie Copson

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