Renovations to South Lakes Village Center to Begin This Summer

Construction on new upgrades to make South Lakes Village Center more of a local destination are planned for this summer.

Thomas Regnell, president and CEO of Chevy Chase Land Company, told Reston Now that construction is expected to start over the next several weeks. Planned upgrades, which include an amphitheater, a bike rack and repair station, and a fire pit, are intended to help turn the aging commercial center into an attractive destination that brings local residents together.

Regnell said it was too early to indicate when upgrades will be completed, but the construction process will take eight weeks.

Some features of the plan — which originally included ping pong tables — were removed at the request of Reston Association’s Design Review Board, which approved the project in June. Citizen groups and nearby residents sounded off against the plans, which they said would attract noise, vandalism, and too much activity.

The project is expected to cost between $300,000 and $400,000, Regnell said.

Photos via Chevy Chase Land Company

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Appian to Move Headquarters to Former Gannett Offices Next Month

Appian Corporation plans to relocate from its current headquarters at 11955 Democracy Drive to Tysons next month.

The cloud computing company will move into Gannett’s former headquarters at Valo Park (7950 Jones Branch Drive), bringing 600 jobs to Tysons.

“The 12.5-year lease for 200,000 square feet in the Jones Branch Drive building was officially signed April 17, complete with a press conference with Gov. Ralph Northam. The lease was a win for real estate group Tamares, which purchased the building from Gannett for $270 million in 2015,” the Washington Business Journal reported last week.

The county gave a $4 million grant to the company in December to help pay for the leasing, improvements, equipment and operation of Appian’s Tysons location.

Logo via Appian/Facebook

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Report: Bowling and Bocce Venue Coming to Halley Rise

Pinstripes, a bowling, bocce and bar venue, is coming to the Halley Rise development, following the first retail, tenant, Wegmans, confirmed its plans to anchor the new mixed use development.

According to the Washington Business Journal, which first reported the news, Pinstripes will open a 20,000-square-foot venue at the development. WBJ also that Brookfield Properties, the developer, is also in talks with high-end movie theater Cinépolis to sign a lease for the new project.

Once completed, Halley Rise — formerly known as Reston Crescent — will have a minimum of 640 residential units, 450,000 square feet of office space and two new parks.

Rendering via Brookfield Properties

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Reston Real Estate: Just Listed

This is a sponsored post by Eve Thompson of Reston Real Estate.

Last week’s “Just Sold” noted a brisk uptick in closed and pending transactions — this week fewer new properties were added to the market, meaning  that new listings are not keeping pace with the sold listings.

It will be interesting to see how this impacts the market. Normally when demand for a product surpasses the supply you’d expect to see prices increase. While we are seeing escalation clauses and “over-list” offers, sellers that come on the market with their prices set high are not moving.

The average days on market for closed transactions is 24 days. If you’ve got a house on the market that’s been sitting for more than 30 days it’s probably safe to say that you’ve not found that nexus of price vs. condition that signals to the buyer — “make an offer now, this one won’t last!”

Here are a few of the new listings in Reston:

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Del. Ken Plum: Adverse Childhood Experiences Cause Lingering Harm

Del. Ken Plum/File photoThis is an opinion column by Del. Ken Plum, who represents Reston in Virginia’s House of Delegates. It does not reflect the opinion of Reston Now.

The message of Dr. Nadine Burke Harris to the 900 Virginia health, education, and human services professionals and advocates at the Voices for Virginia’s Children Summit on Childhood Trauma and Resilience last week was clear: Virginia, as well as other states, needs to move forward promptly on an evidence-based early human services program to screen for adverse childhood experiences and coordinate resources to respond to the needs. It was not a hard sell to the audience. They had already given her a lengthy standing ovation before she started her speech. Most knew of her pioneering work from her book, The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity, or her Ted Talk, “How Childhood Trauma Affects Health Across a Lifetime,” that has reached over 2.8 million viewers on www.ted.com/talks. She is known for linking adverse childhood experiences and toxic stress with harmful effects to health later on in life. She founded the Center for Youth Wellness and is California’s first Surgeon General.

According to Dr. Harris, exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACE) including abuse, neglect, domestic violence and parental mental illness and substance abuse affect 34.8 million children across socio-economic lines and affect not only brain development but can change children’s hormonal systems, immune systems and even their DNA. The results are behavioral problems, learning difficulties and physical health issues. In adults, exposure to ACEs dramatically increases the likelihood of 7 out of 10 leading adult causes of death including heart disease and cancer.

For Dr. Harris early detection is key. Screening for ACEs in children is possible and with appropriate support services the existing and future harm to children’s brains and bodies caused by toxic stress can be alleviated. As Dr. Harris told the group in Richmond, “routine screening for ACEs at pediatric well-child visits should be as common as checking for hearing loss or exposure to lead paint. With early detection children can be treated and saved from a lifetime of health issues.”

Virginia currently has 19 communities throughout the state that have programs referred to as “trauma-informed community networks” that are at various stages of development of programs and services utilizing the findings of research on trauma and its impact on public health. There is little doubt that Dr. Harris’s visit will increase interest among practitioners and policy makers as to a more widespread use of the results of studies on ACEs. An effective program of ACE detection and intervention could lead to reduced health care costs, better performance of students in school, and a better quality of life for those involved. In the long-term, costs would be low or minimal as better diagnoses of conditions should lead to more effective treatments and a reduction in costs.

I look forward to working with Voices for Virginia’s Children–celebrating its 25th anniversary at the Summit–and its advocates to determine the most effective ways to make all programs trauma informed that will serve the entire Commonwealth. Such an approach will reduce the lingering harm that can come from undetected adverse childhood experiences.

File photo

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Election Officers Needed for Primary Election in Reston and Herndon

Fairfax County needs election offices for the June 11 Democratic primary election.

The Fairfax County Office of Elections is looking for officers to serve in Reston and Herndon for the primary, during which voters will select a candidate for the Hunter Mill District Supervisor seat.

Election officers must complete a three-hour training before they can work at polls. Training classes will be offered through late May. Officers are paid $175 for a full day, although officers can also volunteer their time.

Bilingual election officers who can speak Korean and English or Vietnamese and English fluently are also needed.

For more information on becoming an election officer, visit the Fairfax County Office of Elections, or call at 703-324-4735, TTY 711.

File photo

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Thursday Morning Notes

Wireless Service Available in Two-Thirds of Metro Tunnels –“Metro and the nation’s leading wireless carriers, AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless announce that as of today approximately two-thirds of Metro’s tunnels are now wired for cellular and data service. This marks the near completion of underground wireless service in Virginia, with the addition of the newest tunnel segments on the Yellow and Blue lines that are “wireless ready.” [Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority]

Dense Fog Advisory Ends at 9 a.m. The National Weather Service has issued a dense fog advisory, which means that driving “could be impaired due to reduced visibility.” [National Weather Service]

Opening Reception: A Purposeful Manner Towards a Vague Destination — Douglas Moulden brings his artwork to the Greater Reston Arts Center’s exhibition at the Signature (11850 Freedom Drive). The opening reception takes place today from 6-8 p.m. [Greater Reston Arts Center]

Photo by Joe Heflin

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