Reston Museum to Host Exhibit in Honor of 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11 Mission

It’s been 50 years since humans first stepped on the surface of the moon. To celebrate the anniversary of the Apollo 11 Mission, the Reston Historic Trust & Museum is hosting a special exhibit until the end of the year.

The traveling exhibit, which is called Destination Moon: The Apollo Mission, features posters provided by the Smithsonian Institution’s traveling exhibition service and developed with the National Air and Space Museum.

The exhibit features the command module Columbia — the only portion of the spacecraft to return from the mission in 1961 — as well as other mission-related objects.

Here’s more from Smithsonian about the exhibit tour:

The Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission traveling exhibition will bring the iconic Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia to four cities–its first national tour since 1970/71. The exhibition will also include one-of-a-kind artifacts from this historic mission. Organized in partnership with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, the Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission tour will launch in 2017 and will travel through 2019. Eyes will be on the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington, which is slated to host the exhibition during the 50th anniversary of the Moon landing in 2019. The Museum in Washington, DC, plans to mark the historic occasion by displaying Neil Armstrong’s spacesuit–made possible through our Kickstarter campaign Reboot the Suit.

The Reston Historic Trust & Museum is open Monday through Saturday and is located at 1639 Washington Plaza-N.

The exhibit is made possible with the support of Jeff and Bezos, Joe Clark, Bruce R. McCaw Family Foundation, the Charles and Lisa Simonyi Fund for Arts and Sciences, John and Susann Norton, and Gregory D. and Jennifer Walston Joh 

Photos courtesy NASA

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Wednesday Morning Notes

Volunteers Sought for Reston Home Tour — The Reston Historic Trust & Museum is looking for volunteers to help with the annual home tour, which takes place on Saturday, Oct. 19. [Reston Historic Trust & Museum]

Fairfax County Public Schools Maintain High On-Time Graduation Rate — “For the second straight year, more than nine out of ten Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS) high school students earned a diploma within four years, according to graduation reports released today by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE). More than three out of five of these students earned Advanced Studies Diplomas.” [Fairfax County Public Schools]

Herndon Man Arrested in Connection with Assault — Irving Duncan, 33, of Herndon was arrested for the aggravated assault of a victim that is known to him, according to police. The assault happened while the victim was asleep on Oct. 6. [Herndon Police Department]

Photo via vantagehill/Flickr

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Tuesday Morning Notes

Brookfield Breaks Ground on $1.4 Billion Development — “Brookfield Properties celebrated the groundbreaking Monday for Halley Rise, a $1.4B project on the site of a 36-acre Reston office park.  The development’s first phase, scheduled to deliver in 2022, will feature 640 residential units, 450K SF of office and 200K SF of retail. The retail will be anchored by Wegmans, which is bringing its smaller urban grocery store concept to the project, and Pinstripes, a restaurant with a bowling alley and bocce court.” [Bisnow]

Metro Investigates Monday Train Collision — “The investigation into the cause of a low-speed train collision outside Farragut West is ongoing, including analysis of railcar data recorders, control center event logs, and signal system playback.  While Metro has not yet identified the root cause of the incident, investigators have found no evidence of a signal system failure and have ruled out “loss of shunt” as a cause.”  [Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority]

Annual Fiscal Year 2019 Report for Town of Herndon — Herndon Town Manager Bill Ashton presented findings and progress on different measures at a meeting in late September. The report highlights progress on major initiatives undertaken by the town in the last fiscal year. [Town of Herndon]

Early Bird Ticket Rates for Reston Home Tour Ending Soon — The $25 rate for the Reston Historic Trust & Museum’s annual Reston Home Tour is in effect until Friday (Oct. 11). The tour takes place on Saturday, Oct. 9. Regular price tickets are $30.  [Reston Historic Trust & Museum]

Photo by Dario Pipair/Flickr

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Lake Anne Plaza Business Owner Protests Hanging of Historic Pharmacy Icons on Damaged Wall

The owner of a business at Lake Anne Plaza has filed a cease-and-desist order urging the Reston Historic Trust & Museum and the Lake Anne Condominium Association to temporarily halt the installation of the historic Lakeside Pharmacy icons on a damaged wall at the plaza.

Sarah Selvaraj, the owner of Kiln and Co., says that installing the icons — which where removed last year from their original location at the plaza — could cause further damage to the wall near her business. She says the board has not adequately maintained the wall or addressed her concerns about the damage, which she says has stalled her ability to install a much-needed air conditioning unit in her business for almost two years.

“The internal structure of the wall is already deteriorating and the addition of any signage or other load-bearing material to the wall is going to further add pressure and cause significantly more damage to the wall… the ramifications of this would be significant and detrimental to all property with exposure to or supported by the Wall and their property owners,” wrote Maria Simon, managing partner of The Geller Law Group.

A spokesperson for the Reston Historic Trust & Museum said the museum is expected to provide a statement on the issue sometime today. The board did not respond to a request for comment from Reston Now. The icons — which served as advertisements for the former Lakeside Pharmacy — were expected to be installed over the weekend, according to an email received by Reston Now.

The letter also asserts that the board has “ignored repeated requests to make any repairs.”

“When such harm occurs, the LARCA Board and the Reston Museum will be facing significant liability to all parties who have been harmed as a result.”

Selvaraj says she is concerned about a pattern of issues related to maintenance and repairs at the plaza and its businesses.

Her business — a shop that combines the worlds of pottery and custard — is currently closed due to structural damage. A pipe burst last Wednesday caused major damage to the shop. It’s unclear when the business will reopen.

She says operating the Reston location of her business is especially challenging. Kiln and Co. has other locations in Vienna and Falls Church.

“When you look at the empty storefronts at the plaza, you walk around and wonder why. Then, when you own a business here, you no longer wonder.”

Photos via Sarah Selvaraj

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Annual Reston Home Tour Set for October 19

The Reston Historic Trust & Museum’s18th annual Reston Home Tour returns on Saturday, October 19.

This year’s home tour includes five private properties that have different styles and flair. The tour also includes the VY/Reston Heights, new luxury apartments, and Hunters Woods at Trails Edge, a new retirement community. 

Tickets are on sale online and in the store at Reston Museum, The Wine Cabinet, Chesapeake Chocolates and the Greater Reston Arts Center. All proceeds will benefit the Reston Historic Trust and Museum. Attendees can purchase a $12 box lunch at the retirement community and refreshments at VY, courtesy of JBG Smith. 

Descriptions of the homes, which were provided by the museum, are below:

  • Goldcup Lane – Beth Arborgast: “It was “love at first sight” for Beth the first time she saw Goldcup Lane. Built in the 1970’s and still occupied by the original owner, this Michael Oxman designed home had great architectural appeal, but there was work to do! Renovations were not unfamiliar to Beth; after owning 17 homes in the last 27 years, she was experienced at remodeling and took on the challenge. Visitors will enjoy the finished product, including the remodeled kitchen and bathrooms, and soothing paint colors. Modern and minimalistic furnishings and beautiful artwork collected over the years complement the natural Reston setting of the home.”
  • Beacon Place – Matthew Benson and Carol O’Connell:  “On a cloudy day in 1999, Carol was the last visitor of the day at the model home on Beacon Place, and the site manager was on her way out the door. Despite the lights being off and the cloudy sky overhead, the home offered wonderful architecture and natural light that led Carol to draw up the contract the next day. In 2017, Carol and Matt decided to go through a major renovation on the main and upper levels to bring the home up-to-date.They moved into an apartment at Reston Town Center for seven months while their home was under construction. Carol and Matt love to cook and entertain, and their kitchen is the heart of their home. Lots of thought was put into the materials selected. It’s a true chef’s kitchen built to last and sure to inspire.”
  • Wild Bramble Way – James and Tammy Edgemond:  “After seven years in their first home together as a family in Reston, the Edgemonds found their current house of 14 years just by coincidence when they received a letter by mistake. Being a good Samaritan, James delivered the letter to the next street over (which had the same house number as theirs). Noticing it was on the market, they took a peek and put in an offer! Providing more square footage and a larger yard for their growing family without going too far from their friends, the house was perfect for their needs. They sold their home, packed and moved in just four weeks – all just as school was starting. They have done major renovations in all five bathrooms, the kitchen, family room, a fabulous screened porch (their favorite spot), sunroom, office and laundry room.”
  • Wedge Drive – Brandon and Shayda Power: As the first house seen on Brandon’s house tour in 2004 with his realtor, this Wedge Drive home ticked all the boxes. After viewing six to eight more homes, they circled back to Wedge Drive. This was the one! The previous owners were downsizing and relocating to an assisted- living facility and were unsure how they would be able to keep their six-year old beagle, Trouble. Being a dog lover, Brandon quickly offered to keep Trouble. The beagle conveyed! Marrying Shayda in 2013 and getting their dog day care and boarding business off the ground, they were able to start their major house renovation in 2017. With the help of Brandon’s mother, a talented interior designer, and some skilled contractors, they have created a very functional yet exquisite home. Visitors will find amazing entertaining spaces inside and out and incredible use of cabinetry that maximizes storage potential.”
  • Wedge Drive – Ray Fernandez and Kathleen Williams:  With only two weeks to find a house and low inventory to choose from, Kathleen settled for Wedge Drive. She honestly didn’t like the house at first but has since crafted an eclectic home that tells the story of all their travels and chapters in their life. Being a social worker for the Navy, Kathleen has many interesting experiences to share. Each collectible, piece of furniture and artwork help bring the years together. The setting on the edge of Hidden Creek Golf Course among the trees and the garden that is in constant development all help tell the story. Visitors should not miss Ray’s garage, which is his sanctuary. The early bird rate for tickets is $25 and is only available at the museum. Early bird pricing ends on October 11.”

Photos courtesy Charlotte Geary Photography

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Author to Discuss Book on Reston and Other ‘Radical Suburbs’

The author of the book, “Radical Suburbs: Experimental Living on the Fringes of the American City,” will discuss why she classifies Reston as a radical suburb this month.

The event, which features author Amanda Hurley, is set to take place on September 18 from 7-9 p.m. at Reston Community Center Lake Anne’s Jo Ann Rose Gallery.

Hurley’s talk will compare Reston to other communities, including a co-housing commune in Pennsylvania, a tiny-house anarchist community in New Jersey and a government-planned garden city in Maryland.

Here’s more about the book from the publisher:

America’s suburbs are not the homogenous places we sometimes take them for. Today’s suburbs are racially, ethnically, and economically diverse, with as many Democratic as Republican voters, a growing population of renters, and rising poverty. The cliche of white picket fences is well past its expiration date.

The history of suburbia is equally surprising: American suburbs were once fertile ground for utopian planning, communal living, socially-conscious design, and integrated housing. We have forgotten that we built suburbs like these, such as the co-housing commune of Old Economy, Pennsylvania; a tiny-house anarchist community in Piscataway, New Jersey; a government-planned garden city in Greenbelt, Maryland; a racially integrated subdivision (before the Fair Housing Act) in Trevose, Pennsylvania; experimental Modernist enclaves in Lexington, Massachusetts; and the mixed-use, architecturally daring Reston, Virginia.

Inside Radical Suburbs you will find blueprints for affordable, walkable, and integrated communities, filled with a range of environmentally sound residential options. Radical Suburbs is a history that will help us remake the future and rethink our assumptions of suburbia.

Signed copies of her book will also be available for purchase. The event is hosted by the Reston Historic Trust & Museum.

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Lake Anne Cardboard Boat Regatta Boasts Big Turnout

A record number of teams competed in the Reston Historic Trust & Museum’s third annual Lake Anne Cardboard Boat Regatta over the weekend.

This year, 56 teams assembled bright, duct-taped boats to compete in the race on Saturday – the largest number of teams to take part in the event Designs ranged from a large pinwheel to Slinky from Toy Story.

In addition to watching the race, attendees had the chance to run on a life-size human hamster wheel to make a snow cone, as well as fun with super. soakers.

Five Fairfax County public schools took part in the race, as well as several nonprofits, businesses, and families.

Lake Anne Brew House won first place in the navigator category with the fastest time of 1 minute and 45 seconds. Lake Anne Coffee House & Wine Bar took the “the titanic award” and the school winner was “Hunters Woods Elementary School.” From the crop of merchants, Lake Anne Brew also took first place in the “merchants” category. The complete results are below:

Skipper:

  1. Marty Boys
  2. Ehrlich
  3. Eighty-Fifty Nine

Cadet:

  1. Yellow Submarine
  2. Swim Team Kids
  3. The Wild Sloth

Navigator:

  1. Lake Anne Brew House
  2. RHOA’s Ark
  3. Hunters Woods Elementary

Registration for the next race is expected to open in early 2020. This year’s title sponsor was Griffin Owens Insurance Group.

Photo courtesy Charlotte Geary Photography

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Small Change Consignment Says Goodbye to Historic Lake Anne Plaza After 37 Years of Business

Small Change Consignment, a relic of Reston’s history and Bob Simon’s vision for the community, is closing its doors at historic Lake Anne Plaza on Saturday.

The children’s consignment shop — home to hundreds of items and the hearts of consigning families — has cemented its role in the community as a place to buy used clothing and a community gathering place. On a recent Wednesday evening, customers and friends came in to say goodbye to owner Susann Gerstein, 70, who has operated the shop for the last 37 years.

A group of teenagers lined up empty hangers in rainbow form — an organizational style Gerstein loves. She spent most of the night on Tuesday packing away clothes and coordinating donation drop-offs with local nonprofits.

Not much has changed since three young mothers and friends  started the venture on Nov. 21, 1981 in the vacant offices of an optician across the lake. The friends embraced the dark interior — with its Marimekko wallpaper and lime green carpeting. Gerstein’s husband built wooden clothing stands. Gerstein stitched hand-sewn clothing tags.

The paint was still drying when the store first opened. From the first day, customers embraced the business as a place to buy used clothes, chat over the racks and build community. The store has averaged 1,200 consigning families annually.

Eighteen years later, the shop moved to its current location, giving it a bigger space to work with. Gerstein’s paper ledger and the same Rolodexes from its opening day sit on the counter.

“Friendships grow for me here and they’ve grown for me too,”Gerstein said. “That’s the hardest part of saying goodbye.” She said the store brought out the extroverted side of her otherwise introverted personality.

Rents, which had been steadily increasing over the years, skyrocketed this year, making it hard to make ends meet, Gerstein says.

“I tried and we just couldn’t make it work,” she said.

She describes herself as a Reston booster and a big believer in Simon’s vision. Her involvement with Cornerstones, a nonprofit organization that promotes self-sufficiency; the Reston Historic Trust & Museum; and other organizations is clear in the store. She was the founding president of the Reston Museum and helped found the Reston Historic Trust for Community Revitalization.

A Cornerstones donation jar sits on the counter and Gerstein often donates clothing to local nonprofits and domestic violence victims through various community partnerships.

Politics entered her shop following the November 2016 presidential election. Gerstein put up a sign, “Stop Tearing Families Apart” in the window of her storefront. She began selling “Hate Has No Home Here” signs. A fabric banner of children holding balloons — which was made by the friend in the original space — hangs from the ceiling. On weeknights, she tries to ride with members of Herndon-Reston Indivisible to hold lighted letters at the White House several times a month.

“I wanted my store to be a safe space for everyone. Some people didn’t like it but everyone knows where I stand,” Gerstein said.

After receiving calls from Doug Bernstein from popular toy-making company Melissa & Doug for years, Gerstein began having the toys in her shop. She stopped taking used toys after federal regulators raised questions about the quality of plastic and lead used in toys. Her husband built a Melissa & Doug grocery stand, which children often played with as their parents shopped in the store.

Gerstein says running the shop, which she has done since 2002, has been extremely fulfilling and exhilarating. As her last day of business comes near, she hopes to spend more time volunteering in the community, which she did not realize she would warm up to after moving from New York City in the late 1970s. Her grandchildren and three children plan to come from the city for a send-off on Saturday.

On a recent evening, she gazed across the lake to where Simon’s monumental figure sits on a bench. She says she’ll keep her website’s domain running if she finds another place like Lake Anne for the next generation of consigning moms.

“It’s so hard to let go.”

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Registration Ending Soon for Lake Anne Cardboard Boat Regatta

Registration to participate in Reston Historic Trust & Museum’s annual Lake Anne Cardboard Boat Regatta ends next month.

More than 50 teams will construct and decorate a life-size cardboard boats and participate in timed heats during the regatta on Saturday, Aug. 10 from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Registration ends on July 1 or whenever 80 teams have registered. The form is open online. Fees start at $50, with varying sponsorship levels.

Awards will be given to boats in differing categories, including the “Titanic” or the fastest to sink.

All proceeds from the event benefit the Reston Historic Trust & Museum. This year’s presenting sponsor is Griffen Owens Insurance.

Photo via Reston Historic Trust & Museum

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Wednesday Morning Notes

Film on Reston Takes CenterStage Tonight — Dive into the story of how Reston founder Robert Simon envisioned Reston and fought to keep his original principles strong during the film screening of “Another Way of Living: The Story of Reston VA” tonight at 7 p.m. at CenterStage. The event is free and open for all ages. [Reston Community Center]

High Honors for Herndon High School Freshman — The student, Claire, was recognized by the Town of Herndon as the Distinguished Teen Volunteer for 2019. She contributed more than 400 hours of service since 2017. [Fairfax County Public Schools]

Reston Students Win Big at Virginia Odyssey of the Mind — Students from six Fairfax County schools, including several competitors from Reston, earned top honors at the state competition over the weekend. The contest encourages students to solve complex problems. [Fairfax County Public Schools]

A Recap of Founder’s Day — Reston Historic Trust & Museum organized the 2019 Founder’s Day Celebration over the weekend with a day-long event to mark the 55th anniversary of Reston’s founding. [The Connection]

File photo

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Founder’s Day and More This Weekend in Reston

Robert Simon founded Reston in 1964. For the last 54 years, the community has celebrated Founder’s Day in the spring, around the date of Simon’s birthday.

The Reston Historic Trust and Museum is hosting the 55th annual anniversary on Saturday (April 6) with festivities around Lake Anne Plaza.

Founder’s Day this year will include a moon bounce, children’s activities, face painting, a public art tour and exhibits at the Reston Historic Trust and Museum and RCC Lake Anne’s Jo Ann Rose Gallery.

Attendees can also share their Reston stories with recorded oral histories from 1-3 p.m. at RCC Lake Anne. Meanwhile, exhibit enthusiasts can find several around the area including “Fine Lines” at the Jo Ann Rose Gallery, which features artists’ interpretations of lines.

Tomorrow (April 6)

  • Run or walk (8 a.m.) — The Reston Runners will go for a 3-mile walk or 5-mile run starting at South Lakes High School.
  • You Gouda Brie Kidding!” (11 a.m.-2 p.m.) — Frying Pan Farm Park will celebrate National Grilled Cheese month with cooks frying up sandwiches and a variety of cheeses to sample. Attendees can also learn how to make fresh cheese at home and about cultural takes on different melted cheese treats. Tickets are $3.
  • Kwame Alexander and Randy Preston (4-5:30 p.m.) — Newbery award-winning author Kwame Alexander and musician Randy Preston will team up for a performance at the Reston Regional Library. The free show will celebrate the paperback release of Alexander’s “Booked” and “The Crossover” in addition to the release of Alexander’s newest picture book called “The Undefeated.”

Sunday (April 7)

  • Bird walk at Bright Pond (7:30-10:30 a.m.) — Bird enthusiasts can search for birds at a variety of sites around Reston.
  • History of World War II (2-4 p.m.) — Harry Butowsky from George Mason University will present the fourth part of his six-part lecture series at the Reston Regional Library.
  • Liner Notes” (3 p.m.) — A show combining live music, poetry and a multimedia design will perform at CenterStage at RCC Hunters Woods. Tickets are $15 for Restonians and $20 for non-Restonians.

Photo via Reston Historic Trust and Museum

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Reston Then and Now: Icons at Lake Anne Plaza

The Reston Then and Now series is going back to where we started for our penultimate episode: Lake Anne Plaza.

Anyone flicking through the photos overhead — taken from Fairfax County’s Historic Imagery Viewer — might have noticed that very little has changed at the plaza itself over the years.

But as the Lakeside Pharmacy icons show, there’s been plenty of changes in tenants and aesthetics over the years. While he’s somewhat dismissive of them as historic relics, Wayne Schiffelbein, a local artist and architect who once repainted and fixed up the icons at the owner’s request, said the icons and the damages to them tell the story of earlier unease between Reston and Herndon.

“We had people that lived in and around Herndon who did not take kindly to Reston being there, especially ‘northern folk’, like Jews and Blacks being there,” said Schiffelbein. “The people [in Reston] had college degrees. Not only were the houses more expensive, but they were driving better cars, and people knew that.”

Back in the 1960s, as Reston was first getting started, Schiffelbein said there was a lot of tension between Restonians and Herndon residents who would come into areas like Lake Anne Plaza and cause trouble.

Schiffelbein remembered summers where kids from Herndon would come over to his house by Lake Anne, climb onto the roof and jump out into the lake. Not exactly a campaign of terror, but Schiffelbein said the Reston residents were annoyed by the constant footfalls on the roof.

It was during these early years of class-tension that Schiffelbein said the drug store icons obtained the damages some of them still show.

“They discovered they could carry a sheath knife around,” Schiffelbein said. “The drug store had… soft wood. So the knifes would stick. There were tables in front of the drug store where you could have sat and had coffee while playing chess. They would throw their knives at the walls. It took a couple years, but it took chunks out of pieces of wood from the backing and pieces that were there. Toothbrush took a bunch of hits. Comb didn’t do much better. They dinged the bandaid.”

But it was Vietnam that partially put an end to the local turmoil, with many of the young men from Herndon swept up by the draft.

“Tensions with Reston and Herndon went down over time,” Schiffelbein. “Some of the Herndonites were drafted and some of them just grew up, and we’ll leave it at that. It’s something you do as a 15- and 16-year-old is not as appealing when you’re 22.”

In the 1990s, Schiffelbein said he was contracted to repaint and fix the icons after years of neglect.

“If I squint, it’s a flashback to the drugstore,” Schiffelbein said. “It was a real drugstore. It had a counter, some seats at the counter. It was old fashioned drug store. It was very nice. It was small, everybody knew everybody. But as the community grew that ebbed away.”

In the early days of the pharmacy, Schiffelbein said it catered mainly to the older residents at the Lake Anne Fellowship House.

“The older people used a lot of prescription drugs and that was before insurance companies required you to go to their pharmacy,” Schiffelbein said. “In the early years, they would amble across the road and fill 50 or 60 scripts a day. There was a stream of people going into the drug store. A lot of New Yorkers and New Jerseyites moved to Reston in the early years. There was an old man there who played the races. The owner got racing forms every year. I remember that as clear as a bell, I can still see the man’s face.”

The Reston Historic Trust and Museum currently has a GoFundMe set up to preserve the icons, but it’s not going particularly well.

For more Reston Then and Now, check out these earlier stories and come back next week for final Then and Now:

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Save the Date: Founder’s Day Set for This Saturday

The Reston Historic Trust and Museum is hosting the 55th annual anniversary of Reston’s founding with a celebration on Saturday, April 6. 

Festivities for Founder’s Day will run from noon to 4 p.m. at Lake Anne Plaza. 

The event will include a moon bounce, children’s activities, face painting, a public art tour and exhibits at the Reston Historic Trust and Museum and RCC Lake Anne’s Jo Ann Rose Gallery.

Some highlights from the schedule include:

  • 12:05 p.m: Lake Anne Elementary School Chorus & Orchestra
  • 12:50 p.m: Foley Irish Dance
  • 1:20 p.m: Hughes MS Panther Jazz Band
  • 1:20 p.m: guided public art walking tour
  • 1:30 p.m: meet the authors of “Memoir Your Way”
  • 1:45 p.m: Hunters Woods Elementary School String Ensemble
  • 2:00 p.m: Lopez Studios, American Musical Theater
  • 2:15 p.m: Reston Chorale
  • 2:40 p.m: Reston Community Players performing scenes from “Annie”
  • 2:40 p.m: artist talk with Marco Rando
  • 3:05 p.m: Rick Landers, Folk musician
  • 3:30 p.m: ensemble from Reston Community Orchestra

Attendees can also share their Reston stories with recorded oral histories from 1-3 p.m. at RCC Lake Anne.

Exhibit enthusiasts can find several around the area including “Fine Lines” at the Jo Ann Rose Gallery, which features artists’ interpretations of lines.

Over at the Reston Historic Trust and Museum, locals can see Charlotte Geary’s photography in “The Women of Lake Anne” exhibit and also enjoy “Untold Stories and The History of the Sculpture by Zachary Oxman Dedicated to Reston’s Founder.”

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Lakeside Pharmacy Fundraiser Lags, Hopes for Boost at Next Week’s Triathlon

Despite some noble intentions, fundraising to save the Lakeside Pharmacy icons is not going well.

The Reston Historic Trust and Museum’s GoFundMe — which started in August — has only raised $1,663 of its $15,000 goal.

The goal of the fundraiser is to clean and reinstall the icons, currently being held in storage, in a new exhibit about the 1960’s pop art aesthetic that was a core part of early Reston history.

Alexandra Campbell, a media contact for the Reston Museum, said despite public interest — Campbell said stories related to the icons are some of their most popular social media posts — the donations to the fundraiser have been slow to trickle in.

While Campbell said there have been a few donations to the fundraiser outside of the GoFundMe, Carolyn Flitcroft, elected chair of the board for the organization, said in an earlier interview that it can be difficult to rally support for a fundraiser that’s for something that seems less dire than homelessness or hunger.

Campbell said the Reston Historic Trust is hoping for a boost with a fundraiser next week. A triathlon hosted by New Trail Cycling Studio and Lake Anne Brew House on March 27 will give a portion of the proceeds to the Reston Historic Trust.

Despite the fundraising setbacks, the organization is moving forward with the permitting process to get the icons on display. According to Campbell, the deadline to get the permits scheduled for review in April is next week, so it’s all hands on deck as the group works to get the application finalized.

Photo via Reston Historic Trust

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Former Female Athletes to Talk Title IX, Women’s Sports

In celebration of Women’s History Month, the Reston Historic Trust and Museum will bring together four women from a variety of athletic programs to discuss how Title IX affected their careers and women’s sports overall.

Enacted in 1972, Title IX had a dramatic impact on women’s sports by guaranteeing by law equality in federally assisted athletic programs.

Since its founding, Reston’s recreational facilities have been available to all of its residents, according to the museum.

The free event features the following panelists:

  • Vicky Wingert, a documentary producer and former coach for college and high school basketball teams
  • Skye Eddy Bruce, a collegiate and youth All-American goalkeeper, state champion track athlete and founder of the Soccer Parenting Association
  • Valerie Lister, the South Lakes High School assistant coach for track and field and a former sportswriter
  • Jennifer Volgenau Wiley, a former varsity soccer and basketball player at South Lakes High School in the 1980s. She also played Division I soccer at William and Mary.

“Women Playing in Reston: The Effect of Title IX on Women’s Sports” is set to take place on Wednesday (March 13) at 7 p.m. at the Jo Ann Rose Gallery (1609-A Washington Plaza).

A temporary exhibit at the Reston Museum to accompany the panel discussion will be on display throughout March.

Photo via Reston Historic Trust and Museum/Facebook

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