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More Than 500 Participate in Bike to Work Day Reston Pit Stop

by Dave Emke — May 19, 2017 at 10:30 am 18 Comments

Organizers of the Reston pit stop for Bike to Work Day 2017, one of 85 such stops across the region, say their efforts this morning were a big success.

About 525 bicyclists had passed through the stop at the Wiehle-Reston East Metro station plaza as of about 9 a.m., said Ashleigh Soloff, Reston Association’s special events coordinator. She said this is the third year the event has been held at the Metro plaza in coordination with Comstock Partners.

“[Riders] have been telling me that this is the best pit stop that they’ve come through today so far,” Soloff said of participants’ feedback on the event. “It’s very active and lively.”

Nineteen organizations participated in the event to share information and goodies with riders. Food was provided by Whole Foods and Einstein Bagels. A DJ was playing music and giveaway drawings were being held every half-hour.

Soloff said the concept of biking to work is important to Reston Association.

“We’re trying to get everybody out of their cars just for one day, but then they learn that ‘Hey, I can actually do this every day,'” she said.

Rod Colen, of Reston, was riding along with his daughter, Steph. He said increasing participation in bicycling to work is important for multiple reasons, including public health and improving commute times.

“There’s just so much pressure on everybody for productivity and hours and commute time,” he said. “As traffic gets worse, biking to work will actually be competitive.”

Colen said improved infrastructure and planning is needed to increase the number of bike commuters in Fairfax County. His daughter, who now lives in Arlington but works in Reston Town Center, said she doesn’t regularly ride to commute but she chose to today.

“I also have friends who live in Arlington and work in the Town Center who decided yesterday when they found out about [Bike to Work Day], they’re not big bikers, but they were just going to do it casually,” Steph said.

Adam Lind, Bike Program manager for the Fairfax County Department of Transportation, said the county seeks to expand participation in Bike to Work Day each year. He was providing visitors with information including copies of the county’s new bike map. In addition, he said, the county is running a 50 percent discount through the end of May on yearly memberships to Capital Bikeshare, which is expanding in Reston.

The regional Bike to Work Day event is organized by Commuter Connections, a program of the National Capital Region Transportation Planning Board at the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments that promotes bicycling to work, ridesharing and other alternatives to driving.

  • jak135959

    I prefer the Herndon pit stop since it’s actually along the path

    • Richard

      RA organized a great pit stop this morning. I liked the old RTC location previously, but it was even farther from the W&OD. And screw RTC.

  • Mike M

    “We’re trying to get everybody out of their cars just for one day, but then they learn that ‘Hey, I can actually do this every day,’” she said.

    Earth to RA. Earth to RA. No. Not everyone can get out of their cars and bike to work. Very few, if any could do it every day. That is lunacy of the sort I have come to expect from both the RA and the more rabid biker hobbyists. As we can see it’s a very self-righteous and tiny minority mindset that is creeping into policy.

    • Guest

      If you left your basement and rode a bike you might be happier.

      • Mike M

        The weather and the fact that it is Friday makes me happy today. But I will never agree with you biker clowns. Will you ever address my points or have you nothing but point blank insults and name calling?

        • Guest

          If you left your basement and rode a bike you might be happier.

          • Mike M

            If you could up your argumentation, . . .Can’t do it, can ya?
            Amy? Cubsie? Richard?

          • Guest

            No really….get off your computer and go for a ride.

        • Jon Armao

          On another link you said we had lots of bike trails in Reston. Well, you rarely see bikes on these trails. They are not very well suited to biking because of the hills and twists and turns. Bikes are actually dangerous on these trails because most people use them for walking or running. The one trail suited for biking in Reston is the W&OD. Yes, some bikers use it as a speedway and do not use safe biking sense. But most bikers are polite and respect pedestrians and other bikers. This is true also on the roads. Roads with bike lanes are fairly safe and most drivers and bikers respect each other’s right to be there and are courteous. Bikers on the roads are here to stay, so get used to. And make sure you give a 3 foot clearance when you angrily pass them. It’s the law!

          • Mike M

            Jon, I road the bike trails all over Reston. Of course I had no illusions that I was in a bike race. As for dangerous, consider the danger of a single driver out of the hundreds that may pass you looking at the phone. Whump! Physics. It’s the law! It’s only a matter of time.

            Most of the studies on bike lane safety that say they are safe were funded or conducted by pro-bike organizations. There are plenty less biased studies that say the common sense conclusion – bringing cars and bikes together increases the chance of collisions. Whump! And then who loses?

          • Jon Armao

            You take a big chance every time you drive your car. Many thousands die each year in accidents, but that doesn’t stop you from driving, does it?

          • Mike M

            Valid point, Jon. But before you lose your head, think about the difference between car collisions and car-bike collisions.

    • Cubsfan6116

      Actually, that’s how DC has doubled its bicycle commuting population over the past 7 years (from 2.2% to 4%) – by building bike lanes and encouraging people to try riding through programs like this. No, not “everyone” can bike to work, but not everyone can drive or take transit or telework either. So cynical.

      • Mike M

        Here’s a smug, self-righteous newspaper addressing your smug, self-righteous implication that bikes and cars belong together:

        https://www.washingtonpost.com/express/wp/2016/05/12/how-safe-is-bike-commuting-perhaps-less-than-you-think/?utm_term=.954974e2d9bf

        • Richard

          I rode to the event this morning. Being Reston, I didn’t have to ride on the road for any part of my 2 mile trip.

        • Cubsfan6116

          From that article:

          “In more good news for would-be bike commuters, it turns out that D.C. is relatively safe for cyclists, with only 1.5 bike fatalities per million residents, as compared to New York’s 2.4 and Philadelphia’s 1.9, according to 2014 data from the U.S. Department of Transportation.

          That’s probably due to the city’s dedicated bike lanes and trails, Washington Area Bicyclist Association executive director Greg Billing says.”

          I never suggested that shared lanes is not dangerous or good in any way. In fact, I suggested the opposite – that good infrastructure and educational programs (such as bike to work day) makes bicycling safer.

          But then again, you’re just a troll who can’t deal with people who think differently than you. You don’t have to ride a bike, but that’s no reason to cynically belittle those who do. Some people want options. Something wrong with that?

          • Mike M

            Yes. It’s not safe and shifting resources to bikers is out of whack with the general interest. You have yet to refute anything I said. Just saying I am mean and calling names.

          • Mike M

            Oh dear, Cubsie! Also from that article . . .

            Nationwide, you’re more than twice as likely to die while riding a bike than riding in a car, per trip, according to a 2007 study led by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention epidemiologist Laurie Beck.

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