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Residents Gather to Discuss Proposed Road-Stripe Alterations for Bike Lanes, Crosswalks

by Dave Emke — March 17, 2017 at 2:45 pm 110 Comments

Several dozen community members filled the cafeteria at Dogwood Elementary School on Thursday to learn more — and express their opinions — about proposed changes to street designs in Reston.

The proposal from the Fairfax County Department of Transportation to alter lanes on Colts Neck Road, North Shore Drive and Twin Branches Road drew a large amount of reaction, positive and negative, from community members who would be affected. FCDOT officials say the changes would increase safety for all users of the roads — drivers, bicyclists and pedestrians — by allowing for the addition of crosswalks, creating bike lanes and limiting speeding.

“All of this is happening because [the Virginia Department of Transportation] is repaving the roadways, so we have a chance to re-stripe,” said project manager Adam Lind, Fairfax County’s Bicycle Program manager. “The county has a Bike Master Plan that they adopted in October 2014, so we are here simply trying to implement those recommendations.”

The meeting was a followup from a November meeting at which community feedback on priorities for the three roads was gathered.

FCDOT street design community meetingResidents raised concerns at Thursday’s meeting about the potential loss of parking in certain areas, including near Hunters Woods and Lake Anne elementary schools and the Lake Audubon Pool. In addition, worries were brought up by residents including increased congestion on Colts Neck Road and the potential danger of having one center turn lane in areas with left-hand turns on both sides.

“We’re definitely getting feedback from both sides,” Lind said. “A lot of it is people who have their concerns about their specific neighborhoods, and we think we’ve done a decent job trying to address a lot of those concerns, but the point of these meetings is to get this local feedback so we can continue to make upgrades and updates to the design.”

Bruce Wright, of Reston, is a Fairfax Alliance for Better Bicycling board member. He said making Reston a more bike-friendly community is important. In addition, he said, pedestrian safety on Colts Neck Road is a particular concern.

“There have been two pedestrians killed crossing Colts Neck, and I think by going from four lanes to two lanes, it’s going to be safer for everybody,” he said. “I think it’s going to be great if the county goes through with that plan.”

Colts Neck Road redesign proposal/FCDOTAmong the proposals for Colts Neck Road is the call for the creation of at least one crosswalk at Hunters Woods Village Center and a possible pedestrian “refuge island” between lanes. Lind said to create crosswalks, a four-lane road must be altered to become a two-lane road with a center turn lane.

“You go across one lane, you have a pedestrian refuge, and then you go across the other lane,” he said. “We’re not going to add a crosswalk across a four-lane undivided [road] like Colts Neck; it’s just not safe.”

Dave Crocker, vice president of the nearby Hunters Square Cluster, said residents of his community have been wanting crosswalks for years.

“[The DOT] came out a couple years ago and put counters in place and eventually got back to us and said the numbers didn’t warrant crosswalks,” he said. “So we’re pleased to see this proposal here.”

FCDOT street design community meetingBicyclists and non-bicyclists clashed during the meeting, however, about proposals to remove parking and traffic lanes in some areas to make room for bike lanes. One resident said it is “fundamentally undemocratic” to take lanes away from drivers to provide a seemingly disproportionate amount of space for the relatively small percentage of the community that travels by bicycle.

“We’re taking 25 percent of the pavement, a limited public resource, and making it segregated for [bicyclists],” said John Farrell, president of Colonial Oaks Cluster. “The rest of us, the 80 percent of the trips who go everywhere in their cars, are getting deprived the use of that [pavement].”

Bicyclists in attendance said providing dedicated space for riders is a major advantage for everyone involved, as they now must travel in traffic lanes in places without bike lanes.

“Give me a place to get out of the way, and I’ll do it for you,” said one bicyclist. “It’s going to keep me safe and keep the cars moving at speed.”

Suggestions and comments made by attendees of Thursday’s meeting were collected and will be analyzed by FCDOT, Lind said, and the plan may undergo further alterations before it is executed. FCDOT will continue to collect comments until at least March 31. Residents may submit comments by email to [email protected].

Lind said the repaving and re-striping work is expected to take place sometime between May and November.

  • Mike M

    Cars and bikes don’t mix. That’s dangerous fantasy. Naturally only the nuttiest of bikers will show up for these events. They want more at everyone else’s expense.

    Gee. Can we be honest with ourselves about why no one uses the tunnel?

    • LisaR

      Cars and bikes mix just fine. The Commonwealth of Virginia allows cyclists on every road that is not a limited access highway and they have a right to ride in the middle of the lane. I know you don’t like that but that’s the law.

      • John Farrell

        If they intend to ride in the middle of the travel lane, there is no need for bike lanes other than to constrict the ability of the 80% majority to use the roads they paid for.

        • LisaR

          And every cyclist is a taxpayer and a driver, who also pays for the roads. Got another argument, John? Probably not.

          • John Farrell

            And preclude the other 80% of taxpayers from using that pavement? That’s democratic.

      • Mike M

        Then there is that pesky law of physics. Trust me. It supersedes the laws of man. Bicycle strikes are very common. Nutty bicyclist behavior encouraged by their notions of the law and general self-righteousness.

    • Chuck Morningwood

      You smell that mike? It’s in the air….. stay strong bro

      • Mike M

        They can smell the bumper of the guy on his cell phone. They can smell the inside of the ambulance. Might be the last thing they smell.

  • Bernie Supporter

    Another day, another genius idea from Fairfax County, another special interest group (this one is called the Fairfax Advocates for Better Bicycling) who think they’re entitled to take away from the many in Reston to benefit a tiny few.

    “Lane diets”???? Seriously??? Way to go to obfuscate language, guys. Have some bike-riding marketers in the special interest group, do we? (Wonder how many hours they put into that beauty.)

    But here’s a few questions that may not have been asked:

    1) When you pitched turning 4 lanes into two did you make it clear to everyone that its against the law to be 3 feet near bikers? (Starvation lane diet, perhaps?) The special interest group clearly knows the rules about this. Its the first thing that leaps out at you when you visit their home page.

    2) When you conducted your five focus groups to gather input from agencies and organizations, why did you only include adults and children of bike riding age? How many seniors did you talk to? And how many seniors do you think are going to give up their cars and start riding bikes again? Or do you envision Reston to be the next Holland?

    3) When you spoke about safety, did you mention that bicycle accidents make up about 2 percent of all traffic fatalities each year, killing 900 people—200 of them children. In fact, according to the latest statistics available, in 2014, 567,700 people also sought emergency treatment for injuries suffered while cycling. This according to Edgar Snyder & Associates, a personal injury law firm.

    4) Lastly, in a county where traffic congestion is so bad that we have suffered through years of major Fairfax construction to increase the number of lanes on our roads and highways, tell me again how this will make traffic flow better and less congested? (Oh, and can you do it without making up any silly new terms like “Lane diets.)”

    Very proud of those who showed up to protest.

    • LisaR

      Of course you ignore all of the facts about the benefits of a road diet, including the award-winning project on Lawyers Road https://www.transportation.gov/fastlane/diet-can-save-lives

      • John Farrell

        I especially enjoy it when the suicide lane is used to pass traffic moving at the speed limit.

        • LisaR

          yes John, you brought that up at the meeting yet you have no data to prove it. Got another argument you’d like to raise, or are you going to keep recycling the old ones?

          • John Farrell

            Actually another speaker made that point at the meeting,

            I have personal experience of that phenomenon on Lawyers as well.

        • BikeRider

          Someone asked FCDOT for data on these center turn lane accidents. They said they haven’t dug into the data but there is no evidence they’ve seen so far to claim these are dangerous. A quick glance at an FHWA study from 2008 in review such said there weren’t enough head on accidents to make a conclusion. Before using such terms as ‘suicide’ it might be worth looking in to this.

          • John Farrell

            Actually, the term “suicide lane” was coined by traffic engineers.

            I first heard it in connection with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation’s policy change to eliminate center turn lanes because of the high rate of head-on collisions experienced in PA. Maybe FCDOT needs to review PennDOT’s data.

            My youngest son was grieviously injured as a passenger in a head-on collision. I take the potential for such accidents very seriously.

          • BikeRider

            It’s unfortunate your son was injured whether it was in a center turn lane or as the results of a driver’s actions. It’s dangerous out there. And it’s important to realize that nothing is 100%. It’s clear however the safety of pedestrians and cyclists and motorists will be much more so with a road diet. Speed kills and anything to slow it down is a good thing.

          • John Farrell

            Actually, its not clear. The PennDOT policy is to eliminate suicide lanes because they concluded they were not safe.

            If speed is the problem, lower the speed limit and increase the enforcement.

            Reducing road capacity increases congestion on other roads and makes travel more difficult.

          • BikeRider

            Went over to PennDOT and only thing I could find is Driver’s Manual on how to drive in center lanes. Please provide a link to show the elimination.

            Lowering speed limit will not change speeds. And enforcement is hap hazard. Nice try but it doesn’t change behavior all that much. FCPD isn’t going to put a cop there weekly.

            Again….safety vs congestion. Hmmmm.

          • Mike M

            Tighten up the laws; ratchet up enforcement. The Libtard’s answer to EVERYTHING.
            It’s not clear from the data? How about common sense.

      • Concerned biker

        Did you ever see the white bike on Sunrise? Is Sunrise wide enough to.accommodate a bike? If sunrise had a bike strip would you consider it safe to ride?

        Any answers appreciated, thanks

        • Mike M

          No. Not safe. Next question?
          Oddly, we have more bike trails already than any place on earth of which I am aware.

      • The Constitutionalist

        Of course you ignore all of the facts about the benefits of widening the curb lane, including the hundreds of literatures and studies on the subject.

        • Guest

          Studies frequently recommend removing dedicated bike lanes and overall widening on arterial throughways. Think Reston Parkway, not Colts Neck.

      • Chloe Wilkerson

        Have you never seen the many cars that use the center turn lane on Lawyers as their personal passing lane??? I see it regularly. Sometimes, these drivers are passing slow-moving cars. But I’ve also seen several cars that used the middle turn lane to pass one or more cars that already were going over the speed limit.

    • Mike M

      For once we agree.

  • John Farrell

    Bicycles make up only 0.4% of trips and even if bike lanes are provided, bicyclists are not required to use them, by law, and are free to clog the soon to be single lane of travel on Colts Neck.

    Its clear that the overbearing Bureaucrats of FCDOT have already made the decision to bring the evil of suicide lanes to Colts Neck even though the plethora of offset left turns make their efficacy doubtful.

    The real purpose here is to make it harder for automobiles to get around in South Reston and to placate the spandex bandits by turning South Reston into a velodrome for that tiny, arrogant special interest group.

    • Motoring

      John you’re delusional. Those roads never have needed more than 2 lanes. Stop being a NIMBY and embrace some community change.

      • John Farrell

        What’s delusional, as expert traffic engineer, Mike Martin, observed Thursday night is adding tens of thousands of square feet of new office, commercial and residential space along the Sunrise Valley corridor while, at the same time, simultaneously reducing the carrying capacity of Soapstone, Colts Neck and Twin Branches to convey the increase in trips that square footage will generate.

        The boys from FCDOT admitted their analysis had not included the trips from those new buildings in their analysis of their proposals.

        As Mike described, these two phenomenon will result in gridlock on Reston Parkway in the am rush and Sunrise Valley in the pm rush.

        But thanks for playing anonymous troll, now back under your bridge.

        • Motoring

          Do you enjoy living as a conspiracy therorist listening to Alex Jones?

          • John Farrell

            Is Alex Jones on NPR before or after Car Talk?

          • Concerned biker

            I love car talk.

          • Alex Jones

            Ohh!!!! Snap you sure got em there motoring, you so smart!!

        • LisaR

          The “boys” from FCDOT (way to be sexist, John) also presented FACT after FACT about how lower speeds save lives. But that doesn’t seem to matter to you, John. You would rather speed and get home faster, and heaven forbid that someone who is riding a bike slow you down. You’d rather risk their lives instead of opening your mind to another form of transportation. I’ll go back to my bridge, but I’ll be biking there thanks to the new bike lanes on the roads that lead there.

          • John Farrell

            The presenter and his boss were introduced and both are male.

            The only facts presented that were statistically significant were the extent of the speeding on Colts Neck which should have prompted a question to FCPD who were hiding in a corner why there hadn’t been any enforcement efforts on Colts Neck.

            In a democracy resources are supposed to be allocated to serve the majority not 0.4%.

            Those who travel with me would tell you that I am fairfly scrupulous about driving at or under the speed limit.

          • LisaR

            I guess you missed the lady who was introduced, as well as Supervisor Hudgins, who you berated at the meeting. But it seems you only want to see and hear what you want to hear so you can present a worn out argument about your opinions.

          • John Farrell

            Yes, I did miss the young lady. She didn’t participate in the discussion.

            I disagreed with my friend, Cathy Hudgins, and did so respectfully. I’ve done it before when I believed she’s wrong as I believe she is in this instance. I do so directly and not behind her back like so many in this town.

            She and I had an extensive cordial conversation after the meeting about my support for her motion to advertise a $0.02 rise in the real estate tax rate. We also talked about the segregated nature of FCPS and the lack of traffic enforcement by FCPD.

          • The Constitutionalist

            You had to go there, huh? Had to call him a sexist for being jovial and referring to them by what they are. Boys.

            #feministlogic2017

        • biker

          Reston Parkway and Sunrise Valley are not Colts Neck? I don’t follow your logic. Why not show some pictures of current gridlock vs claim such?

          • John Farrell

            Anonymous biker

            I experience them and VDOT numbers demonstrate them. (Curious why VDOT wasn’t there Thursday night. They were there in November.)

            In the morning, northbound Reston Parkway backs up past West Ox Road and sometimes as far back as Franklin Farm.

            In the evening, westbound Sunrise backs up almost to Indian Ridge.

            Colts Neck, Soapstone and Twin Branches are a relief valves for those two roads.

            Limiting the capacity on Colts Neck and Soapstone will make conditions worse on Reston Parkway and Sunrise.

          • biker

            So you want to encourage more cars to cut through the neighborhood thereby putting the people that live there in harm’s way?

          • LisaR

            #johnflogic: When presented with a fact, reply with another disproven, time-worn argment that everyone has heard before.

          • Angela Martin

            Well you also don’t know either the cars that are already around don’t need to go any more so a few more want matter, sir I understand your confusion though

          • John Farrell

            Colts Neck, Soapstone and Twin Branches are not neighborhood roads. They are minor arterials. Just like South Lakes and Sunrise.

            That’s why they were built with 4 lanes.

          • biker

            Wait…..you claim neighborhood residents will suffer due to congestion? So who wins – cut through traffic or residents?

            Argument stands – folks that live there will have to suffer because drivers want to get relief aka cut through.

          • Mike M

            Cuz, . . . cars are bad? No, cars are the default mode for transportation.

    • LisaR

      Spandex bandits? Way to have an open mind, John. Perhaps you should try riding sometime yourself.

      • John Farrell

        Want to have you mind blown, LisaR, come to the intersection of Glade and Soapstone on Tuesday night around 6:30 during daylight savings time and watch scores of spandex scofflaws ride 3, 4, and 5 abreast as they run the stop sign and prevent west-bound traffic from passing them.

        I’ve ridden in the past and understood, unlike too many bikers, that the rules of the road applied to all vehicles, whether they were two wheeled or four wheeled.

        All I heard from the biker crowd Tuesday night was excuses for why it was “ok” for them to break the law.

        Runnning red lights and stop signs is never ok.

        South Reston is not their velodrome. The Tour de France is held on the other side of the pond.

        • Bruce Wright

          It was interesting that one of the complaints a motorist had was about how inconvenient it is to stop at a STOP sign and complaining about getting two tickets. I guess motorists think it’s ok to run STOP signs. Stand on any street corner and watch how many motorists don’t come to a complete stop at STOP signs. They roll through at about the speed of a cyclist.

          • Bernie Supporter

            Drivers who don’t come to a complete stop at STOP signs are not the brightest bulbs in the pack. And worse, even if they do stop at stop signs and red lights, when they finally proceed, they oftentimes do not bother to check to see if pedestrians are right there trying to cross the street.

            Saying that, however, does not diminish the other common sight one sees: Cyclists blowing through red lights and stop signs, and riding too closely to cars (even when there IS a bike lane). Many appear to want motorists to obey the traffic laws (as well they should) but don’t see to recognize that the same rules of the road apply to them.

          • LisaR

            You do know that when a car hits a cyclist, they are usually killed, right? Same thing happens when a bike hits a car? No. But that’s OK, keep advocating that cyclists are feloneous thugs for running stop signs while EVERY driver continues to do the the same thing but never gets a ticket.

          • Bernie Supporter

            Wow. I don’t think I called cyclists felonious thugs. Moreover, I began by acknowledging that — in my opinion — some car drivers are much worse. They make their right hand turns the moment that the light turns red, as if they were driving the Indy 500. They are totally oblivious to the woman pushing a baby cart who has just started crossing the street because she HAD the green light, too.

            That said, if you are suggesting that the cyclists you know riding our streets and staying behind them as if they were cars — and not making their own bike lanes between cars — than I’m not sure you’re being entirely honest, either with me or yourself.

            Sadly, I know all too well what happens when a car — or a bus — goes over its line and hits someone on a bike. Which is why I am against bike lanes unless you live in a country with a culture of them. I have driven far too long to expect other drives not to drift out of their lanes, especially in the day and age of texting while driving. It’s turn that I don’t want to turn four lanes into two …but traffic is not my only concern.

            Until the day that bikes come with rear view and side view mirrors, I simply don’t believe that they belong in the lane next to drivers. Sorry.

          • The Constitutionalist

            Congratulations, the winner of the non-sequitur argument award goes to….LisaR!!!!!!!!!!

          • John Farrell

            Those of us at the meeting who actually listened to our neighbors heard that the speaker had been cited not because she failed to come to a complete stop, as you allege, but rather because her complete stop was over the stop line.

            She went on to explain that the location of the stop line prevented adequate sight distance of opposing traffic.

            She was asking for a relocation of the stop line to enable her better sight distance for opposing traffic.

            But fanatics only hear that which re-enforces their pre-conceived notions.

          • Bruce Wright

            I just rode through the Colts Neck/Steeplechase intersection and saw no problems with sight distance. The stop bars on all legs of the intersection seem fine, better than in many places. What no one mentioned is that there’s an elementary school on that corner and there’s no excuse for running the STOP sign there. When the motorist said that most people turn onto Steeplechase from Colts Neck and that maybe there shouldn’t be a STOP sign, that was an indication of the real issue; motorists can’t be bothered with coming to a complete stop, and when caught, they complain.

            Maybe if we just all obeyed traffic laws and stopped blaming others we’d be better off. According to a recent survey, everyone needs to do a better job: “They found that people admit to breaking the rules of the road at roughly the same (very high) rate, regardless of how they’re getting around.” http://usa.streetsblog.org/2017/03/16/busting-the-myth-of-the-scofflaw-cyclist/

          • John Farrell

            I travel through that intersection almost every day. There is limited sight distance at the stop line on southbound Colts Neck for traffic approaching from the west on Steeple Chase.

          • The Constitutionalist

            Gotta be careful mentioning things like that to cyclists, it’s a fast way to get their spandex panties in a bunch and have granola spit at you.

          • Chuck Morningwood

            When was the last time you heard of a cyclist getting a ticket for failing to stop at a Stop sign? Such enforcement is inherently skewed against cars.

          • TheTRUTHinreporting.com

            You’re fake news, shill!

          • Mike M

            Actually, if you want to see a bicyclist run a stop sign, go to the W&OD crossing at Hunter Mill, Sunrise Valley, or Wiehle. You can even hold your breath. It will be seconds.

        • Donald

          Mr. Farrell, I suspect you’re not promoting the idea of eliminating cyclists from Reston’s roads, correct? What would you suggest be done? Bicycling will continue to grow in popularity, especially around the TSAs. Others, farther out, will want to get to those TSAs.

          • John Farrell

            Those who were in attendance heard me advocate for bikes lane on Twin Branches because it could be introduced without losing parking spaces or reducing lane capacity for the 80% of travelers who use four wheels.

            Even before the introduction of the internal combustion engine, the overwhelming majority of trips were undertaken on four wheels, four legs or two feet. That ratio doesn’t change even in the cities you cite below.

            In a democracy the needs of the many must be given deference over the preferences of the very, very few.

          • Bruce Wright

            Actually bicyclists were among the first advocates for paved roads. From the wikipedia entry on the Good Roads Movement: “The Good Roads Movement was officially founded in May 1880, when bicycle enthusiasts, riding clubs and manufacturers met in Newport, Rhode Island to form the League of American Wheelmen to support the burgeoning use of bicycles.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Roads_Movement

          • John Farrell

            And yet automobles, which were invented after bicycles, quickly surpassed bicycles is popularity.

          • The Constitutionalist

            Of course they were, why wouldn’t they? Paved roads are much harder on a horse’s hooves. Who in their right mind, in 1880, would say, yes please, let’s do something to injure my livelihood and transportation.

            Cyclists on the other hand would’ve loved to ride on paved roads.

            That’s common sense. But it has nothing to do with your argument. It’s 2017, lets leave 1880 where it belongs: in 1880.

        • LisaR

          John, and those cyclists should be ticketed. Perhaps you should try a bike ride sometime and see what cyclists deal with. You know, like when we have to wonder if someone driving a 5000 pound cage is going to run roll a stop sign or buzzes one of us. But you wouldn’t know that, because you are safe in your 5000 page cage. Open your mind sometime, you might learn something.

          • John Farrell

            If you’ve taken the time to read my other comments, you’d know that I have ridden which is why I find the conduct of too many spandex scofflaws outrageous. When they disobey the law and put themselves in danger it is invariably the motorist who gets blamed.

            FCPD’s gross lack of enforcement of speed limits on Lawyers, Colts Neck and Soapstone is disgraceful. FCPD seems to be incapable of establishing speed traps on any road in Reston except that short segment of Steeple Chase between Lawyers and Fox Mill. That one is there weekly.

            Yet FCPD can deploy its air force (aka the helicpoter) to chase down escaped golf carts and truants from SLHS.

            The overbearing, unresponsive County bureaucracies living off the fat tax revenue generated in Reston are in need of a serous attitude adjustment.

          • Mike M

            Respect the laws of physics. Neither mommy nor the government can protect you from them.

        • Resident

          Mr Farrell –

          The Reston Bike Club bike rides are irrelevant to this discussion, as well as the discussion about motorists and cyclists rolling stop signs. As far as the resident who raised the issue of the location of the stop line, FCDOT said they would look into it.

          The issue is safety of motorists, cyclists and pedestrians. So the tradeoff is the following: a motorist on Colts Neck waiting an extra light cycle vs. the injury / death of a pedestrian or cyclist. What do you choose?

          • John Farrell

            Anonymous Resident

            The issue is the proper allocation of limited public assets in a democracy.

            Should 0.4% of trips be award 25% of the pavement to the exclusion of the 99.6% of trips that are not on a bicycle and the exclusion of on-street parking, especially when the 0.4% are free, even in the presence of a bike lane, to obstruct the travel lane?

            The practices of the club riders define the experience of interaction of bicyclists for most drivers.

          • Resident

            When do 99% of those trips occur? Certainly not 24/7? And if at the same time the bulk of those trips occur, should a resident riding their bike home from work not warrant protection from cut through traffic mentioned by another comment? Equity isn’t also measure in majority. If we can’t protect the vulnerable user of our roadways then have we not failed?

            Your arguments are old and tiring. As a user of these roads in my car and on my bike, I want protection while using both. Slowing traffic does that. I am willing to accept a delay so no one gets hurt. I gather you are not.

          • John Farrell

            Anonymous resident

            My arguments haven’t received a cogent rebuttal in this forum or anywhere else only ad hominem attacks.

          • Resident

            Your arguments don’t address the safety of residents who walk across that road and bicyclists who want to ride to work or to the store or to metro. It’s about caving to more congestion vs trying to find a solution. And equity isn’t always about the majority. It’s a half mile at best stretch of road. You will survive and be fine as will the drivers, peds and bicyclists as a result.

            As an example, FCPS changed HS start time. One of the biggest arguments was traffic was going to be a disaster. Guess what – people were resilient and adapted. Traffic is no different and in fact we’ve heard more students are riding the bus meaning less cars.

          • Mike M

            No. They are a well-known community problem. They are arrogant scofflaws.

        • Mike M

          Bingo! They are their own worst enemy.

      • Chuck Morningwood

        I thought it was a particularly cute comment.

  • LisaR

    I’m totally in support of this project. It comes at no cost to taxpayers, provides transportation alternatives, supports the Fairfax County Bicycling Master Plan, and increases safety for all road users. There are no down sides to this.

    Very proud of all of you who showed up to support the county’s proposed project.

    • Mike M

      Um,
      I think you have heard the downsides, but you ARE COVERING YOUR EARS AND SAYING “LA, LA, LA.”

  • Waitwhat

    I’m not fond of the packs of cyclists. That said, I would like safer access for cyclists, not pretending to be in the Tour de France or whatever. I think cycling activity would increase if there were cycling lanes. When I lived in San Francisco, cycling as transportation was great because there were bike lanes on all the major roads. Sure, I still had to use caution, and light myself up like a carnival ride at night. But it worked. I’ve been eyeing those bike rental racks popping up in Reston, and it looks like the bikes are getting some use. That right there tells me we need to safely accommodate our cyclists.

    • Donald

      I absolutely agree. Even at my age, cycling is a wonderful activity, it beats having to get a gym membership. I use a bike to meet people nearby, to see all four corners of Reston, and do light errands as well. Spandex is not required, but boy does it look good on some folks.

      Reston could easily be so far ahead of some fantastic cities that have already successfully incorporated cycling into their transportation systems. Like: Seattle, Portland, Louisville, San Francisco, Portland, Minneapolis, Austin…the list goes on.

      • Mike M

        Reston already has a fabulous bike trail network and it keeps cars and bikes apart.

        • Donald

          Agreed. What a wonderful foundation to work with.

  • 30yearsinreston

    Can spandex and lycra be banned for cyclists
    Seeing bulging bums on skinny saddles puts me off my breakfast

    • LisaR

      Nice open mind, you have there.

  • Dgeorge

    I do like bikes but I wish the police would start a campaign of ticketing bike riders that disobey the laws. I also wish some bike riders would have some common sense. It is legal ,at rush hour, to ride your bike on Wiehle Ave but it is a special kind of stupid, as is riding on Hunter Mill Rd. And they ride with an arrogance that is not unlike a death wish.

    • LisaR

      I wish the police would begin a campaign of ticketing drivers who speed, run stop signs, and buzz cyclists. Every one of those “arrogant cyclists” has a family that wants them to get home. Slow down, give them 15 seconds of patience, and everyone gets home safely.

      • John Farrell

        So the 0.4% get to commandeer limited public resources from the 80% and those of us in the 80% just have to accept it.

        Nice oligarchy you got there Careful, some day you might wind up on the other end of that equation.

      • Dgeorge

        The motorists are ticketed when caught, there are even traps set to catch them. Not so much with bikes.
        Some biker, dressed for the Tour de France Flying down Wiehe Ave at the incredible speed of twenty-five MPH, taking a lane, is the epitome of stupid. Particularly when there is a path that parallels

        • Bernie Supporter

          Oh, I think this is a wonderful idea. Police traps sets at crossroads known for bikers blowing through stop signs .Yes.

      • Mike M

        Shu+ up and drive.

    • Bernie Supporter

      If bikers want access to our major roads, they should be licensed like every other driver — and take a written test to show they know the rules, and commit to obeying them. (I’m not talking about kids or adults simply biking in their neighborhoods or our parks and trails. Only those who intend to ride in traffic.)

      I like your idea about ticketing bikers who disobey traffic laws. As far as I know, though, there is no place in the nation where simply being in public without ID is illegal — which might make ticketing more difficult.

      • LisaR

        Every cyclist also drives a car and has a license. And pays taxes for roads and police.. Got another whiny argument you want to present? Perhaps you should retake the drivers license test and focus on the section about how bikes have the legal right to use every non-limited access road in the state.

        • Bernie Supporter

          I’m sorry. Sounds like you may be one of those bikers who run through stop signs, and I’ve touched a raw nerve here. But if you want another whiny argument, I’m up to the challenge.

          Spin your wheels around this one: When I drive a car, I’m REQUIRED to carry insurance in case I cause an accident. What are you bikers carrying when YOU cause an accident? Your water bottle? Or is it a basket to bring goodies to grandma’s house? Get real.

          • BikeRider

            Did you really just compare the dangers of a bike to a car?

          • Bernie Supporter

            Nope. I compared the insurance requirements of a car to a bike. (Oh, I also answered a sarcastic, know-it-all bike rider who thinks that arguments are only one sided. They rarely are.)

          • BikeRider

            Same thing, else why carry insurance? The damage a motorist would deliver is orders of magnitude more than a bike if at all. Do we start requiring peds to carry insurance too? Or a skateboarder?

          • Bernie Supporter

            Nice. A bait and switch argument. You’re comparing damage rather than liability. Similar but, sorry, not a match. Secondly, are you suggesting that skateboarders should use the proposed bike lanes, as well? Or wait, let’s play more bait and switch. Will you also allow self-balancing electric scooters in your bike lane? How about wheelchairs? Isn’t it fun to misrepresent what the other person is saying?

          • BikeRider

            If VA law allows it then so be it. I don’t care if any of those use the bike lane. They are all vulnerable users of our roadways or cross our roadways and need protections.

            Bernie Person – you are off topic. This isn’t about bike lanes but about a road diet, that is known to improve safety. Bike lanes are an off shoot of the diet and again improve safety.

            You guys all fail to realize that a cyclist accepts the dangers/risks of riding their bike. We put on our helmets, turn on red blinkies, wear safety yellow and cross our fingers a texting/speeding/distracted driver doesn’t end a life. Our decisions are based on getting us to work and back home and sometimes it means doing something that you might not like. Drivers don’t get in their car and immediately have the same worries cyclists do. They do things you might not like too but it’s typically because they are in a rush or the like. So don’t expect us to buckle under to some of these silly arguments.

          • Bernie Supporter

            And what got me off topic: “Did you really just compare the dangers of a bike to a car?” Deflection?

            The point is that the bike lanes under discussion has nothing to do with putting on your helmet or wearing safety yellow. It has to do with taking away car lanes for the many to accommodate the few. I’m against it. You’re for it. With the development going on in the area, I see traffic congestion. I’m not a fan. Worse, I think VA drivers are among the worst I’ve ever seen… frequently texting as they drive … and I predict this is going to wind up hurting bikers. Call it a hunch.

          • BikeRider

            Seriously – you’ve been railing on bikes and stop signs and insurance vs the road diet which you started with. Nice pivot. A Bernie Supporter taking queues from the current administration. 8^).

            It’s not just about bike lanes – it’s about a road diet for safety of all the users. Would you support the road diet w/o bike lanes or is it really about the scofflaw cyclist and not congestion. Congestion is here to stay. We are trying to get folks out of cars via adding choice – bike lanes and bike share. What are you doing?

            Boston drivers are the worst. 8^). And yes texting is going to kill folks – in cars, on bikes, in a crosswalk. I urge you to get involved during General Assembly time and get the rural VA elected officials to pass some laws to stop this. Will you?

          • Bernie Supporter

            Congestion is here to stay is no answer to exacerbating it by turning 4 lanes of traffic into 2. You are NOT trying to get folks out of cars by adding choice. You are trying to advance your own agenda for bike lanes. The idea that most people are going to give up their cars to ride around on bikes is just silly, and self-serving. Coming up with ridiculous plans that only benefit yourself and your family comes directly out of the Trump playbook, not Bernie’s. (And I seriously doubt that at Bernie’s age, he would give up his car to go bicycling – so invoking his name is just as silly as my comeback line about Trump.)

            What am I trying to do about it? Give the other point of view, which is that this is another Tetra-sized mistake. I am tired of a few self-interest groups who always want to tear out chunks of Reston for themselves, no matter how many people are adversely affected by it. (However, I think I agree you about Boston drivers being the worst.)

          • bikerider

            I bet Bernie bikes. I bet he’d support transportation options to allow people to get to jobs. I bet he looks at bicycle commuting as part of building a better health care system.

            Cyclists don’t all agree with specific infrastructure but we do agree that it should be available to all. You are assuming that any support for a bike lane or trail or a law is self serving. It’s not and you are putting words in any supporters mouth. Choice is something we should offer as part of a strong democracy. And a safe choice. And we didn’t say most – you did. Those are your words. But if it’s not there, people won’t be able to do it at all. Bike lanes are part of a healthy transportation system. Trails like many in Reston are great for kids and family but they don’t replace transportation options.

          • Bernie Supporter

            Not sure if Bernie bikes, but I do know that he was/is for making cities more walkable, and getting more cars off the road. Mostly, though, that was though a better system of public transportation, which I agree Reston needs.

            This is what Bernie had to say, which includes his thoughts on bike riding:

            “Public transit can move more people in fewer vehicles, which is good for clean air and reducing carbon pollution emissions. Public transportation saves enough electricity to power nearly 5 million homes in the United States. Despite the potential for public transit and biking to save Americans money and reduce emissions, the United States has a long way to go to make the roads safe for those who choose these alternative modes of transportation.”

            SO… while Bernie likes the idea of biking , he also thinks that there is a safety issue with it. I agree. In a world of texting while driving, I think this is a TERRIBLE idea. And its being done for a limited few. Not for most Restonians.

          • Chloe Wilkerson

            Road diet does not necessarily equal safety. As I commented above, the diet on Lawyers Rd has resulted in numerous drivers using the center turn lane as a passing lane to pass not only slow moving cars but also cars that are already traveling over the speed limit. I see it frequently. At least when there are 2 travel lanes in the same direction, your expectation is that a car will use the other lane to pass slower ones. The expectation with a dedicated center turn lane is that the lane will be used to make turns, not as a raceway for passing. I’ve had more than one close call where I was nearly taken out by an unexpected passing driver when I was attempting to get into the center lane to turn onto my home street.

          • bikerider

            Did you not see the crash reduction data presented by FCDOT? It does equate to safety……but it doesn’t stop idiots from being such.

          • Mike M

            If you look at recent incidents here, drivers are rarely charged with anything. That is because they generally do have the right of way.

        • Tom

          “Every cyclist also drives a car and has a license.” Really? How do you know that for sure?

    • John Farrell

      They must be related to the geniuses who ride on Fox Mill south of Hunt Road at dusk.

  • 30yearsinreston

    Ban spandex shorts
    They are a vusual blot on the environment
    Where is ARB when they are needed

  • LisaR

    Anyone see the new album in itunes by the NIMBYs, featuring lead singer John F? It has some epic ballads, such as “How I was delayed 20 seconds by a spandex bandit on my way to get a Quarter Pounder”. If you buy the album, you can get a free download of the app “NIMBY Bingo, the John F edition. Play with your friends at public meetings, you are guaranteed to win. John will certainly speak up and present all of the same tired worn out arguments over and over again.

    • Mike M

      Have you heard the new one from Lisa R and the Selfies?
      “I wanna bike, to H with everyone else.”

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