80°Clear

Mason’s Famous Lobster Rolls to Open Next Month in Reston Town Center

Mason’s Famous Lobster Rolls, an Annapolis-based restaurant, will open in late September, according to the company’s founder.

The 800-square-foot restaurant will be located at 11939 Democracy Drive, the former location of Red Velvet Cupcakery.

The restaurant would be the first Mason’s Famous Lobster Rolls branch in Virginia. The company has four locations in Maryland, one in Delaware and another in South Carolina. The Reston location’s menu is modeled after the Delaware location.

An exact opening date has not been set yet.

10 Comments

Registration Now Open for ChalkFest at Reston Town Center

Artists of all ages and skills levels can now save the date for the annual ChalkFest at Reston Town Center. The annual street art festival invites artists to transform RTC’s Market Street with chalk drawings.

Registration is now open and artists can register in the following categories. Prizes will be awarded for each category, as well as audience chance awards.

This year’s sponsors include Boston Properties, Reston Community Center, Fairfax County Government, Reston Association, Cooley, and Leidos.

File photo

0 Comments

South Lakes High School Students, Winners of Japan Bowl Invited to Tour Island Nation

Students from South Lakes High School were invited by the Japanese government to complete a weeklong educational trip to the island nation. Through the country’s Kakekehashi project, a people-to-people exchange program, the government extends invitations to winners of the Japan Bowl, a national competition that quizzes American students on Japanese language and culture.

More than 40 students from multiple schools were invited to take part in this year’s trip, which took place from July 3-11. Students visited homestays, interacted with Japanese students at local schools and attended cultural workshops. They also took a tour of Honda Motor Company’s operations.

For SLHS student Emma Sponga, the experience allowed her to apply her knowledge of Japanese in a real-world setting. She has been learning the language since first grade through an immersion program at Fox Mill Elementary School.

Sponga said she was most surprised by displays of kindness and respect in the country, as well as the cleanliness of Tokyo, the country’s capital, which boasts a population of more than 9.2 million.

“While in Japan, it didn’t take me long to notice that respect, not only to others, but to the environment and just about anything around you, is very important to the Japanese people,” Sponga told Reston Now. “Everyone I met in Japan was very welcoming.”

The 26th National Japan Bowl took place in the District in April this year, bringing together more than 200 students from 30 schools. The Kakehashi program is coordinated by the Japanese American Citizens League and the Japan International Cooperation Center.

Photos by Emily Sponga

0 Comments

Del. Ken Plum: Old Dogs and New Tricks

Del. Ken Plum/File photoThis is an opinion column by Del. Ken Plum (D), who represents Reston in Virginia’s House of Delegates. It does not reflect the opinion of Reston Now.

Regardless of the old adage, it is possible to teach old dogs new tricks. In fact, if old dogs are to survive in a modern world characterized by rapid change they must adopt many new tricks of survival and adaptation. Those who do not are headed to the scrap pile of history to serve as examples for those who follow.

As I have mentioned in this column many times, the forerunner of the Virginia General Assembly met first in 1619 making it the oldest continuous legislative body in this hemisphere. Sometimes our current General Assembly meets serious challenges as the leader in change for the good, but too often it acts as a barrier to change that was needed.

I was reminded of this in my recent attendance at the annual meeting of the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL). NCSL describes the states as the laboratories of democracy where different histories, culture, and geography define each of the 50 states with similar challenges for which various approaches to governance are tried. As I explained last week, we can learn a great deal from each other as we meet together. I will share several examples that I think make my point.

All states are struggling with making higher education more accessible, affordable and relevant. Most state higher education systems are based on models that date back centuries. Most agree that those models are not meeting the needs of the students of today. I attended a session at NCSL where the president of the University of Arizona spoke on the changes he has brought about at his school in increasing enrollment, raising the graduation rate, reducing student debt, and increasing research dollars all while decreasing the per student costs.

His story is a very impressive one that can be most easily explained by his setting aside the usual model of university organization and operation and the adoption of an enterprise model that combines good educational policies with successful business practices. We need to take a hard look at adopting some of these successful practices in Virginia.

The conference was in California that is suffering through historically high temperatures, a very serious drought and wildfires that are devouring thousands of acres. My cell phone was set to alert me of happenings back home in Virginia. I got regular alerts of heavy rains, lightning, flash flooding and road closures. It is obvious that the federal government is not going to provide leadership on climate change that is at the root of these issues, and the states must take on the responsibility.

A final example of the need for the old dogs of state legislatures to step up and provide leadership is in juvenile justice reform. We must reduce the classroom to prison pipeline by intervening early with young people in need of services and assistance to keep kids out of prisons that increase rather than resolve their problems. It is less expensive and more humane. Virginia is doing a much better job in this area, but I was also impressed with what I heard is going on in Kentucky and California.

Old and new legislative leaders must learn new solutions!

File photo

5 Comments

Five Men Involved in Attempted Robbery at Hunters Woods Village Center

The Fairfax County Police Department has released new information about an attempted robbery on Tuesday at the 2200 block of Hunters Woods Plaza.

At around 5:15 a.m., a resident told police that several young men attempted to rob him at gunpoint. When one of the men implied he had a gun, the resident ran away. Two gunshots were fired and the group dispersed.

The man described the group as five Hispanic men who were at least 18 years old. Multiple shell casings were found on the scene and one bullet entered another resident’s home.

No one was harmed and nothing was taken. The incident remains under investigation. A helicopter-assisted search following the incident was unsuccessful in tracking the suspects.

File photo

8 Comments

Thursday Morning Notes

Local police now armed with Narcan — In order to tackle the growing opioid epidemic, local police are now equipped with protective equipment that could reverse overdoses, including the popular use of Narcan. [Fairfax County Police Department]

If you’re a tennis fan — Reston Association is organizing a trip to the U.S. Open tennis championships on August 30. The trip is $190 for RA members and $200 for all others. [Reston Association]

Confession letter surfaces in the murder of Reston couple — “The alleged neo-Nazi teen accused of killing a Reston couple inside their home wrote a confession letter, ABC7 has learned. In new documents obtained in the case, the search warrant says the teenager “devolved in detail his actions on the night of this murder. Detectives believe the letter was mailed during the spring to a classmate at the Dominion School, which is now called the Kellar School.” [WJLA]

Photo submitted by Mike James

7 Comments
×

Subscribe to our mailing list