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Reston Real Estate: South Shore and Fairway Drive

This is a sponsored post from Eve Thompson of Reston Real Estate. For a more complete picture of home sales in your neighborhood, contact her on Reston Real Estate.

Ask anyone who lived in Reston in the 60’s and 70’s what the most “exclusive” neighborhood was, and they’ll likely say South Shore Drive and Fairway.

Why? Because each custom-designed single family home is beautiful, the streets are tree-lined, and you float down to Lake Anne Plaza on your private boat.

Almost 50 years later, it is still one of the most tranquil and idyllic neighborhoods in Reston. The variety of architecture makes it one of the most unique and the proximity to Lake Anne and the Town Center make it one of the most desirable.

The neighborhood consists of 3 to 4-bedroom homes built between 1965 and 1970. Most are Contemporary style with hardwood floors and plenty of windows (the better to gaze upon the lake).

Fairway Drive is off Wiehle Avenue, between the two North Shore Drives (for those who don’t know, North Shore is a horseshoe). South Shore Drive sits on Lake Anne, and residents have private dock privileges — and most take advantage of that with private boats that they take to concerts and events at Lake Anne Plaza.

Children attend Lake Anne Elementary, Langston Hughes Middle and South Lakes High School. It’s an easy walk to Lake Anne Plaza or Tall Oaks Village Center and a quick hop over to Reston Town Center. South Shore and Fairway are also just minutes from the Toll Road the new Reston Metro Center.

Autumn is a perfect time to take walk around Lake Anne and to stop to admire this charming neighborhood.

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Fairfax County Planning Commission Defers Decision on Reston Corner

The Fairfax County Planning Commission deferred a decision on an application to rezone 4.3-acres of land to build a 145-unit multifamily building on the southwest corner of Reston Parkway and Sunrise Valley Drive.

Reston Corner, the name of the project, would bring a seven-story, $30 million residential building and a 438 free-standing, above-grade parking garage to the area, which is currently the site of surface parking and stormwater management pond. The garage would serve three office buildings next to the property.

Members of the commission flagged several concerns about the project, including the possibility that lighting in the garage would disturb residents in the adjacent apartment building.

Eight business condominiums who own a building directly south of the development said they were concerned the residential building would produce additional traffic for the Cascades South Condominium Association. David Gill, the association’s president, said the development could add up to 200 cars per day on a road next to the association.

The project is also next to the Reston Crescent, a 36-acre project. Residents would cross through that development to walk to Metro.

The developer took issue with providing $10,00 for a traffic preemption device during site plan approval. Instead, Mark Looney, the development team’s representative said it was more appropriate for the developer to offer the money once development was imminent at the time of the issuance of a building permit.

MaryAnn Tsai of the Fairfax County Department of Planning and Zoning, said the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department often request receiving funds for the devices when site plans are developed.

But Looney said it was unclear why the fire department needs the funds early in the development process but said the development team would be willing to comply with any requests. “If that’s the only point we’re arguing about, then the rest of the project is pretty darn good,” Looney said.

Other planning commissioners said they wanted to see other features of the plan, including the parking arrangement for workforce housing units, whether or not a tot lot would be shared by office tenants and residential units. Fairfax County Planning Commissioner Ellen Hurley also said she wanted to see a space for dog walking — an amenity the project did not yet have.

The commission will vote on the project on Oct. 18.

Photos via handout/Fairfax County Government

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County Mulls Longterm Improvements to Fairfax County Parkway

Fairfax County’s Department of Transportation is exploring ways to improve Fairfax County Parkway. In concert with the state transportation officials, the county plans to begin a multi-corridor study for Fairfax County Parkway from Route 7 to Route 1, covering a span of 31 miles with 83 intersections and 17 interchanges.

The study will offer longterm recommendations for 2040 and review whether or not changes to the county’s current transportation plan are warranted. According to the county, the study will offer “intensive analysis” to spot major problem areas and deficiencies.

Once completed, the study will explore the possibility of tolling and HOV lanes on the parkways, bicyclist and pedestrian mobility, the integration of transit, and if current intersections should be converted into interchanges, overpasses, and underpasses.

The county will lead a public meeting about the study in Reston on Oct. 16 at 7 p.m. in Armstrong Elementary School (11900 Lake Newport Road). A presentation by the county will be followed by an opportunity for public input at 8 p.m.

After initiating a public engagement period, the county will pitch possible ideas to the public by the winter of next year and kickstart another round of public outreach. Officials plan to solidify recommendations by the summer of next year, review study recommendations with the public in the fall and explore any comprehensive plan amendments that might be necessary by the spring of 2020.

A short term study on transportation issues and recommendations for improvements along Fairfax County Parkway and Franconia-Springfield Parkway was completed in 2016. The 113-page report included a mix of recommendations, including improvements to trail crossings on the northbound ramp from Fairfax County Parkway to Sunset Hills Road.

Other meetings on the longterm study are set for today at Navy Elementary School (3500 West Ox Road in Fairfax) and on Thursday at Sangster Elementary School (7420 Reservation Drive in Springfield).

Photo via Virginia Department of Transportation

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Crime Roundup: Stranger Found in Reston Home

A stranger was founding lingering in the back of a home on the 12100 block of Stirrup Road on Oct. 1 at around 11:34 a.m.

The homeowner found the man after she heard her dog bark, according to the Fairfax County Police Department.

He drove away in a dark silver or gray sedan when she approached him. Police said he is white, roughly 55 years old, 6′ tall and around 180 pounds. He also has gray hair and a short beard.

FCPD also reported the following incidents in recent days:

LARCENIES:

2300 block of Hunters Woods Plaza, beer from business

2300 block of Hunters Woods Plaza, wine from business

13100 block of Parcher Avenue, beer from business

1000 block of Seneca Road, license plate from vehicle

11800 block of Sunrise Valley Drive, property from location

11800 block of Sunrise Valley Drive, purses from location

STOLEN VEHICLES:

None reported

Local law enforcement also advises drivers to be on the alert for deer. Fall is breeding season and almost half of all crashes with deer happen during October, November and December.

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Tuesday Morning Notes

Google eyes Reston Station — Google is considering leasing a block of office space near the Wiehle-Reston East Metro station. The Mountain View, a California-based company, is in talks to lease about 100,000 square feet from Comstock Cos. at 1900 Reston Metro Plaza, the building designed by architect Helmut Jahn. [Washington Business Journal]

If you’re coming to the football game — At South Lakes High School’s football game, don’t forget to bring a donation for the school’s food pantry. They’re looking for cereal, toothpaste, deodorant, canned veggies, applesauce, and/or beans. [SLHS Food Pantry via Twitter]

An artful run and a run in the arts — Three runners who also happen to be artists will show off their work beginning today at Reston Community Center. The exhibit ends on Nov. 5. [Reston Community Center]

Photo by Bako Glonti

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