Op-Ed: On Reston National Golfcourse

This op-ed was submitted by Walter Alcorn, a former Fairfax County Planning Commissioner who recently won the Democratic Primary for Hunter Mill District Supervisor. It does not reflect the opinions of Reston Now. We publish article and opinion contributions of specific interest to the Reston community. Contributions may be edited for length or content. 

Recent reports that the Reston National Golf Course has been acquired by two Baltimore area real estate developers, Weller Development and War Horse Cities, have placed many Restonians on alert.  The fate of the golf course has been a hot button issue for the community since 2012 when the previous owner attempted to assert its right to develop the course without an amendment to the Fairfax County Comprehensive Plan.

Weller Development and War Horse have stated that they “are focused on building relationships and working with the communities we serve, and we look forward to being part of the Reston community for years to come.” I’ll take them at their word, but these new owners, and the Reston community, should understand that if elected to the Board of Supervisors whether I would consider even initiating any possible change to the Comprehensive Plan will be guided by two simple principles.

First, any proposed amendment must, as a threshold matter, have the support of the Reston community, and particularly the support of the homeowners and communities adjacent to the golf course. These residents would be most directly affected by any proposed development. They bought their property with the expectation that it would remain a golf course, as called for in the Comprehensive Plan, and those expectations deserve to be respected. In addition, there also must be support from the broader community (e.g., golfers and users of trails through the course).

Second, I don’t believe that the quality of any business decisions made by the property owners are relevant to land use decisions of the Board of Supervisors. If the new owners paid a speculative premium for the property hoping to find a path to development, and if they are unable to secure community support for such development, in my view that is simply the risk of being an entrepreneur in our free market system.

The Reston National Golf Course has been a part of the fabric of Reston since the community was founded in 1964. I understand the concerns of residents in protecting Reston’s open space for recreational, environmental and livability reasons. And with the current Comprehensive Plan designation arrived at unanimously by the task force formed to draft the Plan only a few years ago, I do not support changing the Plan’s designation that this property be a golf course. At some point in the future if the new owners of the golf course can devise a plan which garners clear and broad community backing (including neighboring communities) I would support initiating a process to consider changing the Comprehensive Plan. If not, they should accept the fact that they bought a golf course and look at how to involve more of the community in the lifelong sport of golf.

Photo via Walter Alcorn

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In Race for Hunter Mill District Supervisor, Parker Boasts Big Fundraising Lead Buoyed by Comstock


Maggie Parker, vice president of communications for Comstock Companies and a candidate for Hunter Mill District Supervisor, has received more funds than any candidate running for a district office seat in the county in a single reporting period this year. At least $108,323 of her campaign war chest was given by Comstock or Comstock-linked entities, the developer behind the massive redevelopment of Reston Station.

According to campaign finance reports filed on Tuesday (June 4), Parker’s campaign war chest ballooned over the last several weeks with $254,276 raised in the latest reporting period. She collected $155,375 — roughly 61 percent of total contributions — from 65 donors who contributed more than $100.

In the final stretch before the primary next week, Parker has raised more money in the last reporting period than all four of her challengers combined.

Although Parker spent most of her contributions — leaving her with $11,856 in the bank before the June 11 primary — campaign finance reports indicate Parker is backed by several contributors linked with the development community in Reston.

Former Fairfax County Planning Commissioner Walter Alcorn raised $31,774 over the last reporting period and had $26,821 in the bank. Most of his donations — $28,930 – came from 80 donors who gave more than $100.

Shyamali Hauth, a U.S. Air Force veteran and self-described community advocate, raised $12,366 and ended with a balance of $7,331. She received $6,172 from 22 donors who gave contributions of more than $100.

Laurie Dodd, a local lawyer, raised $9,285 and had $4,468 in the bank. Seven donors gave contributions of more than $100 to her campaign.

Meanwhile, Parker Messick‘s campaign coffers dried out with no donations of more than $100 and a total of $155 raised. He has $1,039 in the bank.

The primary for the Hunter Mill District Supervisor seat is on June 11.

Photo via Maggie Parker

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Hunter Mill District Supervisor Election: Meet Maggie Parker

Five Democrats are running for the seat of Hunter Mill District Supervisor after Cathy Hudgins, the current supervisor, announced plans to retire earlier this year. This week, Reston Now will publish candidate statements for each of the candidates. This is the last profile.

Statements, which are in question-and-answer format, are published in the order in which they are received. With the exception of minor formatting edits, profiles are published in unedited form. Each candidate had the opportunity to answer the same questions in their own words. 

What inspired you to run for this seat?

I’ve always welcomed an opportunity to serve. I thrive on learning, meeting new people, and learning from a broad range of voices. I learned early on that one must consider many perspectives in order to develop a personal viewpoint. I’ve learned that life experiences impact viewpoints, and that thought process is evolutionary. Humans, hopefully, evolve as they age and engage.

I was compelled to run for Hunter Mill Supervisor when it became a vacant seat, Supervisor Cathy Hudgins having announced retirement after 20 years of bold and noble service to Hunter Mill. I am honored to be a candidate; it is privilege.  

Inspiration comes from varied places; I was most fortunate to grow up in a family that was committed to serve. Both my mom and dad were elected officials in my hometown; my two brothers have served their local jurisdictions and my little sister chairs the Board of Education in a town with a school system that rivals that of Fairfax County. My other sister has chaired noble community efforts in California and is a perennial elections officer in her small town. One might say service runs in the family.

What are the three biggest concerns you have for Reston? What do you plan to do address them?

I’m concerned about:

  • Responsible economic growth: Appropriate development in the right places and making sure that our approved development applications are delivered in the highest quality and are integrated with our community. Whether in Reston or Vienna or Herndon, we must make sure that we welcome the new, engage our new residents and business workers, and integrate all with open arms. Reston is a New Town studied by a world-wide audience; as we enter into the ‘next fifty years’ it’s imperative that we be true to the founding tenants.
  • Improved transportation options: Our community needs to respect the fact that we have and will continue to grow, and additional asphalt lanes are a ready solution to congestion. As soon as a lane is built, it is congested, adding exponentially to our carbon footprint. We need to provide safe and connected pedestrian and bicycle pathways, provide overpasses or underpasses across or beneath some of our wide thoroughfares. We need to adapt our suburban-built thoroughfares into a more urban street grid; often slowing traffic results in better throughput through intersections and community centers.
  • Quality of Life for All – Equity in Housing Options: We have a shortage of housing options — running the range from low-income for-sale and for-rent inventory, through housing options for our service workforce, and onto aging in place and/or affordable senior alternatives. We have thought leaders and industry leaders in our community; we can find solutions.

How can the county improve how it manages growth and development in this growing community, especially as it relates to infrastructure needs, transportation, and affordable housing?

The County is doing a good job of working to plan for our future. Like anything, it can always do better. Current attention can to transportation and infrastructure financing options needs to remain a priority, and efforts to evaluate options for means to provide housing diversity are imperative. Solutions come through many avenues, such as developer commitments to provide work force housing programs in new multifamily buildings, developers paying a fee per square foot per commercial development added and convening industry experts to review national best practices for finding and funding diverse housing types. We will need to review zoning code; we can find solutions.

What do you hope to accomplish in this position?

I hope to provide excellent customer service to all of the Hunter Mill constituents, to enable transparent and inclusive conversation about pressing issues and to ably represent the voice of Hunter Mill on a board of ten. I hope to make the voice of Hunter Mill influence the continued success of Fairfax County, and be recognized as the key driver in the County’s prominence.

Photo via Maggie Comstock

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Hunter Mill District Supervisor Election: Meet Shyamali Hauth

 Five Democrats are running for the seat of Hunter Mill District Supervisor after Cathy Hudgins, the current supervisor, announced plans to retire earlier this year. This week, Reston Now will publish candidate statements for each of the candidates.

Statements, which are in question-and-answer format, are published in the order in which they are received. With the exception of minor formatting edits, profiles are published in unedited form. Each candidate had the opportunity to answer the same questions in their own words. 

What inspired you to run for this seat?

Our local government is where the rubber meets the road. This is where we make change that affects each of us on a daily basis. I have led a life of service around the world, across this great nation, and right here in Fairfax County. I want Fairfax County, and specifically the Hunter Mill District, to be the leader of a progressive vision of community. It is time for change in the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors. Many of our supervisors have done an incredible job of governing over the past 20 plus years, but the county has changed drastically since they first took office. We need new leadership that reflects the desires and diversity of the community.

As a grassroots community organizer, I understand the benefit of building a community from the ground up. I understand the importance of engaging voters in decisions that will affect their lives. I have walked miles and worn out shoes knocking on doors and talking to residents about their concerns, asking for their input and expertise, and advocating for those concerns before our elected officials. I bring a proven track record of leadership and a collaborative working style which will help me serve the Hunter Mill district with compassion and integrity.

What are the three biggest concerns you have for Reston? What do you plan to do address them?

Problem 1: Climate Change

Solution 1: We need a multi-faceted and bold approach to addressing climate change in Fairfax County. I would like to see us increasing the minimum LEED standard to Gold for any new construction and renovation — with an incentive for Platinum. Placing solar panels on schools and government buildings is a start to reducing our dependence on carbon-based fuels, but we also need to encourage our businesses to do the same and reduce our overall energy use. We must also reduce traffic congestion by lowering the cost of and increasing the use of public transportation systems. Additionally, we can initiate several consumer-oriented changes like a single use plastics ban, an increased emphasis on waste reduction, and the introduction of front yard gardens and zero-scapes.

Problem 2: Affordable Housing

Solution 2: I have a S.M.A.R.T.E. (Safe, Mixed Income, Accessible, Reasonably Priced, Transit-oriented, and Environmentally Sustainable) housing plan. This plan is comprehensive and would incentivize new construction and renovations to include percentages of housing accessible to various income levels. In addition, we need to be creative and use the concepts of tiny or small houses, add-on mother-in-law style apartments, utilizing existing offices and other buildings for new housing and community space, and creating community based housing.

Problem 3: Education

Solution 3: Our teacher and staff pay needs to improve and we need to bring equity across the school system. For both safety and to improve the learning environment, we need to address the overcrowding and excessive use of trailers. We need to ensure we are providing the best education for all of our students and that includes offering apprenticeships for those not choosing to attend a four-year college, or skills based learning for students of differing abilities. I also value our language immersion programs as they foster a broader world view and allow our students to develop new ways of problem solving. In order to address inequities in our education system perhaps the greatest impact will be through offering universal free pre-K programs. Finally, I will work hard to ensure our curriculum and school environment is inclusive and welcoming.

How can the county improve how it manages growth and development in this growing community, especially as it relates to infrastructure needs, transportation, and affordable housing?

We need to ensure as growth and development occur, they are accompanied by appropriate infrastructure support and completion. This includes ensuring we look at new school facilities as well as number and locations of first responder services and other community services. In addition, we need to re-examine some long-term infrastructure plans to determine if, as changes in lifestyle create new modalities of travel, we are planning well for our future needs. One of my biggest concerns in developing housing that falls within the 30% of income level is that it needs to be integrated throughout the community and especially near transit. We cannot make the mistakes other communities have done and have transit oriented equate to high cost “luxury” housing. Making our community transit-friendly means we need to be sure areas are walkable and have appropriate lighting for safety and ease of use. We must also look to emerging technologies to encourage more environmentally sound and commute-friendly transportation options.

What do you hope to accomplish in this position?

It is essential we address climate change in a bold and impactful way. If we don’t do this, all other decisions will not matter. My hope is to accomplish this while listening and responding to the needs and desires of our residents. I will ensure the voices of all residents are heard, including those who work two jobs, have a person with a disability at home, or simply cannot afford to make it to a meeting. I will help maintain a vibrant economy through support for our locally owned small business community, ensure needs of families are met through an excellent education system and affordable housing, and make our county the leader in addressing climate change. For over 30 years I have led a life of service: in the military and in communities in which I have lived. I would be honored to continue serving you as your next Supervisor.

Photo via Shyamali Hauth

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Hunter Mill District Supervisor Candidate Returns $500 from ALEC CEO

(Updated at 1:50 p.m. to clarify that the ALEC contribution and contributions from Alcorn’s developer friends are two separate issues). 

Walter Alcorn, a candidate running for the seat of Hunter Mill District Supervisor, has returned small donor contributions from the  CEO and Strategist of the American Legislative Exchange Council, a right-wing, pro-business group that has been criticized for furthering the goals of its corporate benefactors.

The donations were flagged in a May 3 press release by opponent Laurie Dodd, who is one of five candidates running for the seat.

In that release, Dodd also pointed out that Alcorn accepted contributions from developers in violation of his pledge to not take money from developers.

Alcorn said the donations were from college friends who do not have projects in the Hunter Mill District. He said he has maintained his pledge to decline donations from developers, noting the small size of the contributions from ALEC employees.

According to the latest campaign finance reports, the Democrat raised nearly $71,000 and has $44,942 in the bank — well beyond his competitors.

In 2012, the Democratic Party of Virginia condemned donations from ALEC, stating that the organization is on a “stealthy mission to purchase our democracy,” powered by funding from the Koch brothers.

Dodd told Reston Now that Alcorn’s statements about the matter are unethical and deeply disturbing.

Alcorn clarified that he will not accept contributions from developers who have a stake in land-use cases in the Hunter Mill District.

Dodd, Shyamali Hauth and Parker Messick have also pledged to accept no developer contributions.

Photo via Walter Alcorn

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Hunter Mill District Supervisor Election: Meet Laurie Dodd

Five Democrats are running for the seat of Hunter Mill District Supervisor after Cathy Hudgins, the current supervisor, announced plans to retire earlier this year. This week, Reston Now will publish candidate statements for each of the candidates.

Statements, which are in question-and-answer format, are published in the order in which they are received. With the exception of minor formatting edits, profiles are published in unedited form. Each candidate had the opportunity to answer the same questions in their own words. 

What inspired you to run for this seat? 

As a 23-year resident who has raised 2 children through our public schools, I know that Reston is a unique, inclusive community which has so much to offer. But Reston is at risk from poorly managed development that has threatened to take our open spaces and harm our quality of life. For years, I have been active with community groups who want to protect our planned community. That concern merged with my passion for the environment, and I decided that nothing I could do would have a greater impact than helping manage development in Fairfax County. As supervisor, I will foster smart growth and transit-oriented development while protecting our green spaces. And I will take action to reduce our carbon footprint and fight climate change.

My work as a child advocate attorney also inspired my candidacy. In that role, I have helped ensure that our most vulnerable children get the quality education they need in our public schools, along with mental health care. Both of these vital services provided through our county must be supported and improved.

What are the three biggest concerns you have for Reston? What do you plan to do address them? 

My top concern is uncontrolled development. We see this problem in the continuing battle to protect our open spaces (including two 18-hole golf courses) and the fight to avoid raising the density cap in our planned community. As supervisor, I would not approve more residential development without asking whether we have the schools, roads, parks, and public safety to serve them. We need transit-oriented development and expansion of affordable housing opportunities.  I will not give up one more inch of the district to unplanned growth.

Fairfax County should take the lead in addressing environmental issues through a public/private partnership, engaging the best minds of our region to find innovative solutions. We must move forward with a community-wide energy and climate action plan. Replacing our streetlights with efficient LED lighting is a good start that must be followed by bold action, including a focus on improving our transit system. Transit options must be expanded and buses upgraded to appeal to riders, reducing our reliance on cars.

Education is my third concern. We must fund universal pre-K. Teachers and other staff need pay raises, while class sizes are reduced. We must establish equity throughout the county by improving our lower-performing schools. When our county has more than 800 trailer classrooms, saying that our school system is “fully funded” rings hollow. We must accelerate our capital investment to eliminate trailer classrooms rapidly. I will work with the school board to ensure that we provide a world-class education to our children and future leaders.

How can the county improve how it manages growth and development in this growing community, especially as it relates to infrastructure needs, transportation, and affordable housing? 

Fairfax County residents thrive when growth is managed. The Reston area continues to benefit from the vison of Robert Simon, who believed that high-density housing combined with open space for recreational activities could create a lively and varied community. This philosophy merges easily with today’s transit-oriented development, which emphasizes compact walkable design focused on transit centers and allows decreasing dependence on cars. With expansion of the Silver Line, transit-oriented development should move forward in Fairfax County, while open spaces like golf courses and parks are protected. Bus service should be upgraded to be more convenient and appealing, allowing easy mobility from transit centers to retail and residential sites. Because elected officials should be able to make decisions about development without any possible conflict of interest, I have chosen not to accept any campaign funds from developers.

Affordable housing is a growing need in our area. The county should devote an additional penny on the real estate tax rate to create housing where our teachers, service workers, and young families can afford to live. As Supervisor, I will focus on protecting and increasing affordable housing in all parts of the county — not only in dense areas but also allowing duplex or triplex homes in lower density areas of the county. Affordable housing could be put into underused office buildings, if amenities like shopping and schools are nearby, or co-located in county projects that serve other purposes, like the Residences at the Government Center. Creative solutions must be explored.

What do you hope to accomplish in this position? 

Fairfax County should continue to be one of the best places to live in this country, with diverse neighborhoods, quality schools, and housing options for all. We should become leaders environmentally, bringing together the best minds of our high-tech region to solve energy issues and driving to zero carbon emissions by 2050. Our community-wide climate and energy action plan can become a model for others to emulate. Our transit system should evolve to decrease the amount of time and energy we spend getting from here to there. And all residents should share in a high quality of life that is sustaining and sustainable, with the equity and justice we all deserve. I believe I can lead Hunter Mill District towards this goal.

I am the only candidate in this race who has the breadth of experience in our district, who does not take a dime from corporations or developers — no matter where they have projects, who has advocacy skills to speak up for our residents, and who is beholden to no one but the citizens of Hunter Mill District. This is the leadership we need, now and for the future of Hunter Mill. I hope you agree.

Photo via Laurie Dodd

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Hunter Mill District Supervisor Candidates to Discuss Business Issues Next Week

Candidates running for Hunter Mill District Supervisor will discuss their ideas about business issues at a candidate forum next week.

The Greater Reston Chamber of Commerce is hosting a forum on Friday, May 17 from 8-10 a.m. at Cooley Law Offices (11951 Freedom Drive). Candidates vying for the seat vacated by Hunter Mill District Supervisor Cathy Hudgins will touch on issues including budget and taxation, growth and development, transportation, and affordable housing.

Tracy Baynard of McGuireWoods Consulting will moderate the event. After candidates make opening statements, Baynard will ask follow-up questions. No time is allotted to rebut other candidates’ responses.

Questions, which will not be shared in advance with candidates, will be pre-selected by GRCC’s planning committee and can be submitted to [email protected]

Four Democrats are running for Hudgins’ seat: Walter Alcorn, Laurie Dodd, Shyamali Hauth, Parker Messick, and Maggie Parker

Photo by Greater Reston Chamber of Commerce

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Friday Morning Notes

Hunter Mill District Supervisor Candidates Discuss Plans — Candidates running for the seat of Hunter Mill District Supervisor Cathy Hudgins answered questions posed by Greater Greater Washington. Topics explored include transportation, diversifying housing stock and affordable housing. [Greater Greater Washington]

Volunteers Needed for Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival — The Greater Reston Arts Center is looking for around 500 volunteers to help organize the festival, which takes place next weekend on May 17 through May 19. [Greater Reston Arts Center]

Les Miserables Performances Continue This Weekend — South Lakes High School’s theatre group continues performances through Saturday at the school’s auditorium. Shows today and tomorrow start at 7 p.m. [South Lakes High School]

Photo by Marjorie Copson

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Election Officers Needed for Primary Election in Reston and Herndon

Fairfax County needs election offices for the June 11 Democratic primary election.

The Fairfax County Office of Elections is looking for officers to serve in Reston and Herndon for the primary, during which voters will select a candidate for the Hunter Mill District Supervisor seat.

Election officers must complete a three-hour training before they can work at polls. Training classes will be offered through late May. Officers are paid $175 for a full day, although officers can also volunteer their time.

Bilingual election officers who can speak Korean and English or Vietnamese and English fluently are also needed.

For more information on becoming an election officer, visit the Fairfax County Office of Elections, or call at 703-324-4735, TTY 711.

File photo

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Hunter Mill District Supervisor Forum on Environment Set for Thursday

Candidates vying for the seat of Hunter Mill District Supervisor Cathy Hudgins will participate in a candidate forum on the environment on Thursday (May 2).

The forum, which includes candidates for supervisor in the Dranesville, Providence and Sully Districts, takes place at the Northern Virginia Hebrew Congregation (1441 Wiehle Avenue ) from 7-9 p.m.

Candidates will share their environmental and energy platform with Fairfax County constituents. Star Muir, an associate professor of communication at George Mason University, will moderate the event.

So far, Hunter Mill District Supervisor candidates Walter Alcorn, Laurie Dodd, and Shyamali Hauth have confirmed their attendance, according to event organizers. The election is set for June 11.

The event is hosted by 350 Fairfax, faith Alliance for Climate Solutions, Food & Water Action, Friends of Accotink Creek, Our Revolution Northern Virginia and other community partners.

File photo

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In Race for Hunter Mill District Supervisor Seat, Alcorn Boasts Big Fundraising Lead

As the race for the Hunter Mill District Supervisor seat heads to the wire on June 11, former Fairfax County Planning Commissioner Walter Alcorn is well ahead of the four other Democrats vying for the seat.

Alcorn has a sizeable war chest of $44,492 after raising $70,975, dwarfing fundraising efforts by other candidates, according to the latest campaign finance report. Alcorn pulled in 144 donations that were more than $100, including $10,000 from the Consumer Technology Association, an Arlington-based standards and trade organization.

Democratic candidates are seeking to fill the seat of Hunter Mill District Supervisor Cathy Hudgins, who was first elected to the board in 1999 and is nearing the end of her fifth term. Hudgins announced her intention to retire in January.

Laurie Dodd, a Reston-based lawyer, and Shyamali Hauth, a U.S. Air Force veteran and community advocate, competed for the second place spot. Hauth raised $16,372 and spent nearly $11,000 while Dodd raised $15,634 and spent $9,203. A significant chunk of that number — $6,000 — was from a loan she gave herself.

Parker Messick, a recent Roanoke College graduate, raked in $6,916, out-raising Maggie Parker, an executive with Comstock Companies, who had $3,949. Parker was a late comer to the race, as she announced her candidacy days before the campaign finance report period ended. Parker spent all of her cash, all of which came from herself.

Messick announced his candidacy before Hudgins said she would retire while Parker joined the race just a few weeks ago. He also spent most of his funds, leaving him with $1,732 as of March 31.

The Reston Citizens Association plans to hold a Hunter Mill District Supervisor forum today at the Jo Ann Rose Gallery (1609-A Washington Plaza N.) from 7-9 p.m.

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Tuesday Morning Notes

Hunter Mill Supervisor Candidates’ Forum To Take Place Today — Reston Citizens Association is hosting a forum after Reston Community Center at Lake Anne today from 7-9 p.m. Moderators will lead the discussion, but questions will be accepted from the audience. [Reston Citizens Association]

Brookfield Platform Gives Access Across 13 Buildings — Brookfield Properties is rolling out a new platform that gives office tenants across a 13-building portfolio, including several buildings in Reston like Halley Rise and Summit II. [Bisnow]

Silver Line Phase Two Construction Prompts Lane and Ramp Closures –– Several lanes will be closed through Saturday this week, including parts of Herndon Parkway, Sunrise Valley Drive, Sunset Hills Road and Dulles Toll Road. A complete list of closures is available online. [Dulles Corridor Metrorail Project]

Flickr pool photo by vantagehill

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Friday Morning Notes

Some of the Area’s Largest Veteran-owned Companies are in Reston — With 82 employees and $502.8 million in total revenue last year, ThunderCat Technology (1925 Isaac Newton Square) is the second largest veteran-owned company in the District area. Other Reston companies also topped the list. [Washington Business Journal]

Hunter Mill District Supervisor Candidates’ Forum Set for Tuesday — Reston Citizens Association is hosting a candidate forum from 7-9 p.m. at Lake Anne Community Center (1609-A Washington Plaza N). Dennis Hays, RCA’s president, said the organization is “very excited to resume our long tradition” of hosting a candidate forum. [Reston Citizens Association]

Fox and Kits Get Some Attention — A red fox and her kittens have built a tiny home in Autumnwood area. A video of the mom calling to her babies has generated some attention online. [Walker Nature Center]

Flickr pool photo by vantagehill

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JUST IN: Comstock’s Maggie Parker Running for Hunter Mill Supervisor

Maggie Parker, an executive with Comstock Companies who played a role in helping to bring the Silver Line to Reston, is joining the increasingly crowded Democratic field for Hunter Mill Supervisor.

Parker, who last month was honored with a Cornerstones of Our Community Best of Reston award, has lived in Fairfax County since 1986. She says she’s running on a sense of civic duty and a “passion for responsible, collaborative dialogue.”

As a vice president for Comstock, the Reston-based real estate developer, she handles areas including communications, government relations and community relations.

“She has been helping Comstock integrate its new neighborhoods, Reston Station and Loudoun Sta­tion, into our regional community since 2010,” according to a press release. “She has spent her time listening to and engaging with regional authorities, jurisdictions and citizens to find thoughtful connections and integration.”

She stands out from the current field of contenders for Cathy Hudgins’ Hunter Mill District Supervisor seat by being a real estate developer in a field that has expressed varying degrees of opposition to or concern about continuing development in Reston and Vienna.

“Maggie believes in quality development in appropriate places and diligence in providing timely and multi-modal transportation solutions,” the press release said. “She strives to protect an environment that is sustain­able, and that allows all in our community to live, work and prosper.”

She also “supports sustainable growth in the right places, economic development, continued pursuit of transportation solutions — all things that work in concert to improve equity opportunities for our community.”

Four other Democrats have entered the race for her seat on the county’s Board of Supervisors, including:

The Reston Citizens Association plans to hold a Hunter Mill District Supervisor forum on Tuesday, April 23, at the Jo Ann Rose Gallery (1609-A Washington Plaza N.) from 7-9 p.m.

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Reston Citizens Association Announces Hunter Mill District Supervisor Candidate Forum

Residents in Reston and Herndon will soon get the chance to attend a free forum featuring the candidates running for Cathy Hudgins’ Hunter Mill District Supervisor seat.

The Reston Citizens Association plans to hold the forum on Tuesday, April 23, at the Jo Ann Rose Gallery (1609-A Washington Plaza N.) from 7-9 p.m.

The association is hosting the forum to allow Restonians to learn more first-hand from their potential supervisor’s positions and plans first-hand, according to a press release.

“RCA is very excited to resume our long tradition of connecting the citizens of Reston and the Hunter Mill district with their local leaders and with the information they need to make informed decisions,” Dennis Hays, the president of the Reston Citizens Association, said in the press release. “We expect this to be the first of many such forums.”

Hudgins announced her decision in January to retire after her current term ends.

Four Democrats have entered the race for her seat on the county’s Board of Supervisors, including:

Fairfax Democrats will hold their candidate forum on Monday, April 29, from 7-9 p.m. at the Reston Community Center (2310 Colts Neck Road).

Photo via Fairfax County Republican Committee 

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