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Retirement Community at Hunters Woods Eyes Spring 2019 Completion

A Pennsylvania-based company plans to complete a senior citizens’ independent living and assisted living facility nears Hunters Woods Village Center by the spring of next year.

The $72 million project — the first Virginia location for IntegraCare — aims to address the shortage of senior housing in the Reston area. Of the 210 housing units, 91 are for independent living, 80 are for assisted living and the remaining units are a combination of memory care and continuing care.

“This land was repurposed and purchased by a developer who did a significant amount of research to make sure that we were going to meet the cultural needs of the Reston community,” said Cissy Nickel, executive director of an IntegraCare location in Easton, Maryland. “We’re trying to create a mini-Reston within Reston.”

The community, called Hunter’s Woods at Trails Edge, is located on a 4.3-acre lot at 2222 Colts Neck Road, the former location of United Christian Parish.  The county approved the project, which is being developed by Atlantic Realty, AEW Capital Management and IntegraCare, in 2007.

Nickel said the company sought to mirror programming available for other residents within its community, especially given the close proximity of Turquoise Nature Trail. The project includes several dining venues, a beauty shop, a barber shop, an art studio where instructional classes will be offered, a library, a computer laband a garden with vegetables, herbs and flowers. The community will also include what Nickel called “man caves” or separate areas for men and women.

An underground garage includes more than 160 parking spaces, in addition to eight surface parking spaces. Nickel said the development team is working with Reston Association and Reston Community Center to provide transportation to and from the organizations in order to allow seniors to attend classes, programs and events.

The company is still working on how it will lease market and affordable housing as the project nears completion. Twenty percent of the units are affordable, Nickel said. The income level served by the units was not immediately available. It is likely the company will lease the market and below market units in a rotating cycle.

“There’s a huge need in the area and obviously our need is going to exceed our availability. We’re going to have be really methodical about it,” Nickel said.

A temporary office and showroom will open in mid-to-late June in Hunters Woods Shopping Center to provide more information, she said. Individuals 62 years and older can qualify for housing. 

Atlantic Realty Company did not respond to multiple requests for comment over several days from Reston Now.

Rendering by Moseley Architects

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Construction to Begin Monday on 210 New Senior Living Units

On Monday, construction is set to begin on 210 new senior living units in Reston.

The units, to be called Hunters Woods at Trails Edge, will be located in place of the former United Christian Parish Church at 2222 Colts Neck Road.

Of the 210 units, 90 will be designated as independent living, 81 for assisted living, 15 for special needs, and 24 assigned to memory care.

The project will offer 20 percent of the independent living units as affordable units, and 4 percent of the assisted living beds will be available for residents who are eligible for the Virginia Department of Ageing and Rehabilitative Services Auxiliary Grant Program.

The project will offer 20 percent of the independent living units as affordable units, and 4 percent of the assisted living beds will be available for residents who are eligible for the Virginia Department of Ageing and Rehabilitative Services Auxiliary Grant Program.

Fairfax County supervisors approved the project in May 2016. A ceremonial groundbreaking was held at the site in March.

The community will occupy a 4.3-acre lot across the street from Hunters Woods Village Center. Hunters Woods at Trails Edge will offer modern units with dining rooms, family rooms, activity rooms, fitness centers and indoor parking. The facility will also include an arts studio, barber shop, and salon.

Advanced security and communication technology will be installed, and residents will have access to community-wide WiFi, say project representatives.

In addition, a new bus shelter will be built on the property to allow for access to public transit, and the facility’s shuttle service will provide transportation to additional transit, medical facilities and shopping centers.

Developers said Reston’s Turquoise Trail pathway will be lighted, as it passes under Colts Neck Road to Hunters Woods Village Center, where residents will have access to Reston Community Center, and six “Life-Trail stations” designed specifically for senior fitness will be installed along the nature pathway on site.

Additionally, five outdoor terraces will overlook landscaped grounds, mature woods and nature trails.

Hunters Woods at Trails Edge is being developed by a team comprised of Atlantic Realty Companies, AEW Capital Management and IntegraCare.

“Hunters Woods at Trails Edge has been a long time in the planning,” said David A. Ross, president of Atlantic Companies. “We are proud to bring this leading-edge amenity to the community, the first of its kind in Reston.”

Helping to put the project together was Avison Young senior housing expert Jim Kornick, who works on a team with Dan Baker that specializes in senior housing investment across the country.

“It will be an exceptional community that will provide the highest quality of care,” said Kornick, “You could not ask for a nicer community in a better location.”

Representatives said construction costs are estimated at $72 million for the 230,000-square-foot project. Construction is set to begin Monday, and is expected to be complete by January of 2019.

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Ceremonial Groundbreaking Takes Place for Hunters Woods Senior Living Community

Dirt was overturned Thursday morning at 2222 Colts Neck Road, which will soon become the home of the Hunters Woods at Trails Edge Senior Living Community.

The former site of the United Christian Parish church will be transformed between now and January 2019, project leadership says. When complete, the IntegraCare facility will have 210 senior-living units — including 90 independent living units, 81 for assisted living, 24 for memory care and 15 for special needs.

“This facility is going to offer a very broad continuum of services for the seniors in our community,” said David A. Ross, partner and president of developer Atlantic Realty Companies. “We are proud to bring this leading-edge amenity to the community, the first of its kind in Reston.”

The property is located roughly across Colts Neck Road from the entrance to Hunters Woods Village Center. As part of its partnership with the community, the developer has agreed to contribute $81,300 to improve pedestrian trails and pathway lighting within a half-mile of the facility; as well as $60,000 to target improvement of the facade of the Colts Neck pedestrian underpass, in coordination with Public Art Reston and Reston Association.

In addition, $20,000 is being provided for capital improvements to the Nature House.

Fairfax County Supervisor Cathy Hudgins said these contributions show an understanding of community needs.

“We, 50-plus years old here in Reston, know that for those of us who want to stay here, you have to provide a place for us,” she said. “This is a really great facility in that it meets those needs and it really serves the community.”

Ellen Graves, president of the Reston Association Board of Directors, said the addition of the senior-living community to Reston is a promotion of founder Bob Simon’s vision of providing for people throughout their entire lives.

“[The project supports this] by providing the fullest range of housing, styles and prices,” she said. “Hunters Woods at Trails Edge will provide a choice for those growing older in our community and who want to remain here.”

Among the independent-living units, 20 percent will be designated as affordable housing units, while 4 percent of the assisted-living beds will be for those eligible for the Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services Auxiliary Grant Program. There is planned to be 48 full-time staff positions on site, with other medical service professionals providing on-site services as well.

Thursday’s ceremony represented the latest milestone in a 10-year journey to make the facility a reality. The 4.3-acre site was first approved by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors for 210 independent-living units in 2007, but the plan was later amended to the current design. The new plan was approved by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors in May 2016.

Pennsylvania-based IntegraCare has several other communities in the Mid-Atlantic region, but this will be its first in Virginia.

“This is really a once-in-a-career opportunity, to be involved in a project that has the nature of this project,” said Rick Irwin, the company’s CEO. “[We are grateful to have] the opportunity to be right near the Reston Community Center and the Southgate Community Center, where our residents can get our support and care but [also] maximize their independence… and have such great access to stay within the fabric of this Reston community.”

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Ground To Be Broken Later This Month for New Senior Living Facility

Assisted and Independent Living at Hunters Woods/Credit: Fairfax County

Several years in the making, work will soon begin on construction of a 230,000-square foot senior living facility at a former site of the United Christian Parish church.

Ground is scheduled to be broken on the IntegraCare facility at 2222 Colts Neck Road on March 30. The project, expected to be completed by 2020, will include 91 independent-living units along with 79 assisted-living units, 24 memory-care units and 16 units for high-acuity patients.

2222 Colts Neck Road/Google MapsThe 4.3-acre site was first approved by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors for 210 independent-living units in 2007, but the plan was later amended to the current design. The new plan was approved by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors in May.

The building is to be constructed in two wings, one along Colts Neck Road and the other along Reston Parkway. The former church building still stands on the wooded site, the entrance to which is roughly across from the entrance to Hunters Woods Village Center. A permit application to demolish the building was filed March 9 with Fairfax County.

This will be Wexford, Pennsylvania-based IntegraCare‘s first facility in Virginia.

Illustration via Fairfax County; Map via Google

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Update: Supervisors’ Hearing on Senior Facility Postponed

Former United Christian Parish land on Colts Neck RoadThe Pennsylvania company planning a large senior citizens housing development for the Hunters Woods area has asked to postpone the public hearing before the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors until April 26.

The plans for IntegraCare’s 230,000-square-foot facility were slated to go before the supervisors for final approval last Tuesday.

In February, the Fairfax County Planning Commission recommended for approval plan amendments that move along the application.

The 4.3-acre lot at 2222 Colts Neck Rd. — the former site of United Christian Parish Church — was first approved by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors for 210 senior housing units in 2007.

IntegraCare, which has facilities in Pennsylvania and Maryland,  plans to retain 91 of the 210 previously approved independent living units and to add 79 assisted living, 24 memory care, and 16 high-acuity assisted living/memory care rooms.

The building will be 230,000 square feet in two wings, one along Colts Neck and one along Reston Parkway. The estimated completion date is 2020.

The assisted living facility will feature multiple dining venues, a theater, salon, barber shop, physical therapy unit, fitness center, library and computer center, Club room, sun room, outdoor fitness stations, raised gardening area, and an arts and crafts center, and a Memory Care garden, according to a county planning department staff report.

Some more details about the Colts Neck project from the county staff report:

  • Both the independent and assisted living facilities will accommodate residents age 62 years or older.
  • Two stages of memory care will be offered at the assisted living facility.
  • Changes from the 2007 proposal include a covered driveway to the main entrance to the assisted living wing; a covered walkway to the independent living facility wing, and a revised community garden layout.

Some development conditions added to the plan in October:

  • A minimum 65-foot-wide buffer should be provided from existing edge of pavement of Reston Parkway.
  • Affordable housing at a minimum of 20 percent of the total number of units should be provided.
  • Restoration and enhancement of the impaired Snakeden Stream Valley that is located in the northern portion of the parcel should coincide with redevelopment.
  • Pedestrian access from the site to the Snakeden Stream Valley trail, the abutting multifamily housing development to the south, the Village Center to the east, and Colts Neck Road should be provided.
  • A total of 128 parking spaces are required and 177 spaces are being provided to meet the parking requirement for the independent living facility and medical care facility (assisted facility) uses.

Some of the developer proffers:

  • 20 percent (18 units) of the independent living facility units will be offered as affordable housing units.
  • The County’s Health Care Advisory Board (HCAB) recommended that four percent (five beds) of the proposed assisted living facility beds be provided through the Auxiliary Grant program of the Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services.
  • Fairfax County Fire and Rescue requested funding for the cost of two preemption devices for traffic signals ($10,000 each) located along the primary travel route from the Fox Mill Fire and Rescue Station.
  • The Park Authority recommended clustering the outdoor fitness stations rather than dispersing them along the 8-foot wide asphalt trail along the northern boundary. IntegraCare has proffered to cluster the fitness stations.
  • The applicant previously proffered to apply a contribution of $161,300 to the Reston Association Walker Nature Center, but that proffer has been revised and may be applied to not only the Nature Center but to pedestrian improvements and/or public art in the vicinity, according to the staff report.
  • The developer will construct a pedestrian trail along the Property’s frontage on Colts Neck Road.
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Longterm Care: Is it the Right Choice for Your Loved One?

This is a promoted post sponsored by Erickson Living. It does not reflect the opinion of Reston Now.

Making the decision to move your loved one to a long-term care setting can be difficult and confusing. Here is some important information to consider:

WHO would benefit from long-term nursing care?

Longterm care is appropriate for seniors who need complete assistance with daily living tasks like bathing, eating, dressing, and toileting. It is most appropriate for older adults with major health conditions or those who have permanent physical limitations brought on by a stroke or other serious illness. Seniors diagnosed with dementia or Parkinson’s disease may be good candidates for long-term care.

WHEN is the right time to seek additional support?

Caring for a loved one with around-the-clock needs can be challenging. Consider making the transition to a longterm care facility if your loved one’s health condition requires a level of support that exceeds what can be provided in your home by a family caregiver.

A continuing care retirement community like Ashby Ponds in Ashburn, Va., may be an excellent choice. Ashby Ponds employs full-time physicians and health providers who specialize in senior care. As an integrated team, they create a personalized plan to match your loved one’s unique needs and preferences.

HOW will I pay for long-term care?

Longterm care insurance plans can offset the cost, but these policies need to be in place before a major health event occurs. And while Medicare generally doesn’t cover long-term care stays in a nursing home, it often does cover hospital care, doctor services, and medical supplies. If your family chooses to pay for care with their own funds, be sure to ask each facility you’re considering about their payment options.

HOW do I prepare my loved one for a move to longterm care?

Once you have selected a care center, be prepared to share photos, brochures, and other educational materials with your loved one so they have a sense of where they’ll be living. Most importantly, listen to and acknowledge their concerns. Demonstrate that you understand their feelings, and assure your loved one that the move is the best way to ensure they receive the care and attention they need.

WHERE should I turn to find the best long-term care solution for my loved one?

Seek advice from sources you can trust. Your family physician or a hospital social worker can point you to long-term care facilities in your area. Friends or family who have placed a loved one in long-term care may be able to make a recommendation. You can also search the The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Nursing Home Compare website for nursing homes with five-star ratings and inspection records.

Be sure to add Ashby Ponds to your list of care centers to consider. A 5-star CMS rated facility, Ashby Ponds offers residents and their families quality care and unparalleled peace of mind.

Call 571-748-6033 today to schedule a personal tour of Ashby Ponds long-term care, or visit www.ericksonliving.com to request a free brochure.

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How to Know When It’s Time to Consider Memory Care (Promoted)

The following post is written and sponsored by Erickson Living

As a caregiver, you’re navigating difficult decisions on a daily basis as your loved one faces changes in health and capability. Caring for someone with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease can be particularly draining, physically and emotionally.

If you’re struggling to meet your family member’s evolving needs, ask yourself these three questions to help determine if it’s time to consider a memory care facility.

Have your loved one’s health needs advanced beyond your capabilities?

Your family member’s medical care may become increasingly complex, making it difficult for you to keep up with their needs. Physical and mental ailments related to advancing stages of dementia and Alzheimer’s — including sleep disturbances, depression, and incontinence — complicate the already delicate care routines you’ve established.

Your loved one may exhibit unusual and inappropriate behaviors, including verbal and physical aggression. Often, the anger can be inadvertently directed toward the caregiver, creating frustration and resentment. Are these physical and emotional challenges beyond your abilities?

Is your loved one safe in their current home environment?

There is a significant chance that your family member will wander away from your home, even in the time it takes you to make a trip to the restroom. Ask yourself if your home is secure enough to prevent this from happening, as it may become more frequent.

You may also be concerned that your loved one will expose themselves to danger attempting to use household appliances, or they may simply have difficulty getting around the house due to troubles with balance or reliance on a walker or wheelchair. Are you prepared for emergencies, including fires and injuries?

Is your health at risk?

Caregivers experience high levels of stress on a daily basis. Be honest with yourself–have you noticed any decline in your physical health while caring for your loved one? Are you more anxious, exhausted, or irritable than normal? Do you have trouble concentrating?

Because your family member relies on you for care, your quality of life directly affects theirs. If you can’t maintain your own good health, you may be doing them a disservice.

A continuing care retirement community like Ashby Ponds in Ashburn, Virginia, can provide a solution to these and other concerns. Ashby Ponds offers independent living residences along with higher levels of care on the same campus.

With the assistance of a dedicated staff, your family member’s day-to-day life will be safer, simpler, and more fulfilled. The physicians and senior health specialists at Ashby Ponds create an individual care plan for every resident, which can greatly benefit their quality of life.

Most importantly, you’ll enjoy peace of mind knowing that your loved one is receiving the personalized health care of the highest quality.

Call 1-888-820-9623 today to schedule a personal tour of Ashby Ponds and learn more about memory care. You can also visit EricksonLiving.com to request a free brochure.

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Del. Ken Plum: How to Serve Our Aging Population

Del. Ken Plum/File photoLast week, Bob Brink, a former colleague of mine who represented Arlington-McLean in the House of Delegates and who was appointed by Gov. Terry McAuliffe to be Deputy Commissioner for Aging Services, spoke to the Northern Virginia Aging Network’s (NVAN) annual legislative summit. His talk, “The Age Wave: Ready or Not, Here We Come,” highlighted the challenges of the aging of our population.

“By 2030, as the last of the age wave turns 65, we will number 1.8 million people here in Virginia — 20% of the population,” he said, often flashing his Medicare card. “There are more of us, and we’ll be living longer: the fastest growing segment of our population will be those 85 and older.” While in 2010 nearly 1 in 8 Virginia residents were 65 and over, by 2030 nearly 1 in 5 will be in that age range.

The age wave presents challenges to our society beyond the obvious impact on our health care system, he said. Adults age 65 and older are now twice as likely to be living in poverty as they were a decade ago. Almost 200,000 Virginia households, half of them 62 or older, are living in substandard conditions. Opportunity costs to those who are family caregivers will total more than $400 billion in lost wages, pensions and Social Security. The cost of government services will rise at a time when revenues are not keeping pace or dropping.

The Northern Virginia Aging Network (NVAN) is made up of the six area agencies on aging serving the jurisdictions of the region, as well as the critically important regional service and advocacy organizations and volunteers. Brink indicated that the state Aging Division “will be aggressive in encouraging innovation in service delivery, including formation of public-private partnerships” to provide needed services. He praised the Fairfax County Elderlink, a public-private collaboration of the Fairfax Area Agency on Aging, Inova Health System and the Alzheimer’s Association for care coordination of older adults.

NVAN had recommendations for meeting the challenges of the age wave, among them expanding Medicaid services that would provide direct benefits to about 62,000 older Virginians who do not have and cannot afford healthcare. Ironically, at a time of shrinking revenues, the expansion of Medicaid would bring back to the Commonwealth $5 million a day in taxes already paid by Virginians.

Recognizing that most seniors prefer to stay in their own homes, NVAN recommends tax credits and grants that would expand consumer access to livable homes. The professionals and citizen volunteers who make up NVAN see the need for a quality, cost-effective, continuously trained long-term care workforce to improve the quality of life for older adults and people with disabilities. The demand for long-term care workers is expected to increase by 160 percent by 2030. A critical element in building such a workforce is paying a living wage. An expansion of Virginia Public Guardianship Program is seen as needed for vulnerable adults.

Commissioner Brink implored those in attendance to reach across jurisdictional lines and outside bureaucratic boxes as we work to meet the needs of our aging population, or as he expressed it, “to ride the wave together.”

Ken Plum represents Reston in Virginia’s House of Delegates. The views and opinions expressed in this column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Reston Now.

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Will Reston Replace Cameron Glen With New Style of Senior Living?

Cameron Glen Rehab facility

In 2014, Reston will be losing its only nursing and rehabilitation center when Cameron Glen closes its doors and moves to a new facility in Loudoun County.

However, area eldercare advocates are exploring whether Reston may be a good place for a new style of senior living.

Reston resident Steve Gurney, publisher of the Guide to Retirement Living SourceBook and a member of Reston for a Lifetime, has been consulting with non-profit The Green House Project, an Arlington-based organization that helps communities build a more homelike senior living arrangement.

Green House homes try and replicate the feel of a home rather than an institution, says the Green House Project. Homes are designed for 10 to 12 residents, with private rooms and bathrooms as well as common open spaces.

The Green House Project says this model gives residents four times more contact and reduces staff turnover.

“There really is going to be a void to fill,” says Gurney of Cameron Glen’s closing. “The concept [with The Green House]  is you are not living in an institution, you are living in a home.”

There will be an informational meeting about the potential project for Reston on Feb. 12, 2 p.m. at  at Reston Community Center Hunters Woods.

Green House has helped open one other facility in Virginia, Woodland Park at Virginia Mennonite Residential Community in Harrisonburg. Woodland Park has three homes, but plans to eventually have 10. It can accommodate a wide range of needs (certified nurses and nurses aides, dietitians, etc.)  in its partnership with the larger Virginia Mennonite campus.

There would be several “hoops to jump through,” to get the project organized in Reston, says Gurney. Among them: raising money, cooperation from the county, organizing partnerships with existing healthcare organizations such as Reston Hospital Center or Inova, land acquisition and Medicare/Medicaid approval.

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