After Appeal, Heritage Preservation Review Board OKs Downtown Herndon Redevelopment

In a flashback to its hurried approval of the downtown Herndon redevelopment project last year, the town’s Heritage Preservation Review Board unanimously approved Comstock’s application to demolish several buildings to make way for the mixed-use project last night (Wednesday).

The board granted Comstock, which is leading the public-private partnership, Certificates of Appropriateness that allow the developer to proceed with the project. The HPRB’s approval last June prompted several property owners neighboring the project to file an appeal on the grounds the project was approved prematurely.

Last year, the HPRB approved the certificates to demolish buildings at 770 Elden Street and 750 Center Street, as well as the exterior architecture of the development, despite staff’s recommendations to defer the decision to a later date.

Mike McFarlane, who was the lone dissenting vote on the board last year, voted in favor of the project last night. After discussions with staff, McFarlane said the reasons why he initially opposed the project — the size, mass and scale of the building — were not within the purview of the board.

“There was more than gentle arm twisting from some elements in the town that I resented,” he added.

Residents who testified at last night’s hearing overwhelming supported razing the buildings, including the site of the former Stohlman Subaru, which one resident said had a roof that was “flapping in the wind.” Supporters urged the HPRB to approve the project, which they said would give the town a sense of place and has been anticipated for years.

Noah Klein, Comstock’s legal representative, noted that the properties under question were not historic landmarks and did not contribute significantly to heritage preservation. He said Comstock would continue to work with residents to incorporate some elements of the to-be-demolished buildings.

“The concept is to present a new and vibrant design but also connect it to the historic heritage,” Klein said.

John Vassello Jr., one of the appellants who challenged the HPRB’s decision last year, said he was still dissatisfied with the project. Although he noted he does not oppose the development, Vassello said he was vexed about the lack of public involvement and questioned whether the HPRB’s vote was influenced by town officials, who have a vested interest in the project.

The town’s attorney cut off Vassello’s remarks after he reached the maximum allotted time of three minutes. A resident who supported the project read Vassello’s remaining testimony.

The meeting concluded with applause from the audience. The vote was unanimous.

Photo via handout/Town of Herndon

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Town of Herndon to Consider Divine Healthtech Institute at the Crossroads

A vocational school for entry-level healthcare fields could be coming soon to the Crossroads (1037 Sterling Road, Suite 101).

The town’s planning and zoning staff recommended placing several restrictions on the proposal to open a Divine Healthtech Institute prior to approval. Vocational schools require a specific exemption from the town to operate in this area.

Conditions include holding no classes before 8 a.m. or after 10 p.m. and allowing town officials to inspect the property during “reasonable hours.”

Staff maintains a level of concern with allowing multiple uses within one condominium suite from a general standpoint. In this specific case, staff believes the proposed use is similar enough to the existing use that any potential negative impacts could be mitigated by placing conditions on the approval,” according a the March 13 staff report.

If approved, the school would only be allowed to offer one class at a time in the 300-square-foot location. The condominium suite where the school would be located has a hodgepodge of uses, including two offices that are used for Nathan Travel and Cargo, a travel agency.

Rev. Leonard Chukwujiioke, a school administrator, said each class will have only five students. Weekend programs will be by appointment only. A morning and evening class will be offered on weekdays.

Most recently, the Herndon Town Council denied a plan to bring a mini-mart to the Crossroads last year. Plans for a barber shop were withdrawn after the town conditioned approval of the application with several requirements. The operation of a personal service business was approved last year.

The town’s Planning Commission will consider the plan at a 7 p.m. public hearing today (May 13).

Photo via handout/Town of Herndon

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Units in Herndon’s Metro Square are ‘Move-In Ready’

It’s official: Herndon’s Metro Square development at 23 Silver Drive next to the planned Herndon Metro Station is now complete.

All units in the project, which includes four buildings with 64 total condo units, are move-in ready, according to Soledad Portilla, Stanley Martin Homes’ land acquisition manager.

Portilla told Reston Now that the company expects to be completely sold out next month.

The developer still needs to complete infrastructure improvements like installing a final layer of pavement on the roads, some pavers, final touches on pocket parts, and some sidewalks, Portilla said.

Photos via Stanley Martin Homes

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Heritage Preservation Review Board Flags Design Concerns about Junction Square

The Town of Herndon’s Heritage Preservation Review Board is taking issue with several design elements of the newly constructed Junction Square neighborhood at 700 Lynn Street.

At an HPRB meeting last night (April 17), no resolution was reached. Andrew Garcia, the Town of Herndon’s deputy zoning administrator, said the developer has not responded to the board’s comments and requests for information. The applicant did not attend the meeting.

Local staff said parts of the building are different from the design previous approved by the town. The commercial building at 700 Lynn Street has different window and door openings, as well as a different downspout configuration, according to staff. The color of windows on the second floor of the same building are tan instead of dark brown. Flood lights have also been above five Elden Street storefronts and the Lynn Street building. The base of two storefronts on Elden Street also do not match HPRB-approved drawings. Awnings along the facade of the commercial building and one Elden Street storefront has not been installed, staff indicated.

The board deferred discussions about the issue to a May 15 public hearing. The seven-member entity issues “Certificates of Appropriateness” for exterior alterations, additions, new construction and demolition of structures in the Heritage Preservation Overlay Districts. Properties in these districts are scrutinized by the town more closely than others in order to preserve the town’s traditional neighborhoods and maintain a community identity apart from the “suburban growth of the urbanizing region,” according to the town’s policies.

But it’s unclear how town officials will ensure the development conforms with heritage preservation guidelines. Garcia said the developer could consider deconstructing part of the building to fix the downspout configuration. Legal action could be an option, but its likely the applicant could challenge that course of action, Garcia said.

“There may not be a reasonable solution at this point,” he said.

Photo via Google Maps

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