Morning Notes

Comstock Unveils Reston Station’s Next Phase — The company plans to build a six-tower, two-million-square-foot project complementing its Reston Station buildings on the opposite side of the Dulles Toll Road. Plans include the demolition of the building at 11400 Commerce Park. [Washington Business Journal]

Diversity and Accessibility in Reston Comes Into Focus — Reston Community Center is hosting a discussion on Reston’s early dedication to diversity and accessibility today. The event takes place online. [RCC]

County Warn of Covid-related Scams — The county is encouraging residents to be wary of Covid-related scams, including fake testing kits and misinformation about treatment methods on social media. [Fairfax County Government]

Photo by Marjorie Copson

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Art Spiegelman, the author and cartoonist of the critically acclaimed “Maus,” is speaking at the Reston Community Center later this month.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic novelist will appear at the Reston Community Center’s Center Stage to present “What the %@&*! Happened to Comics,” an examination by Spiegelman himself of the value of comic books and graphic novels and why they should be celebrated, not ignored.

RCC’s Executive Director Leila Gordon offered the following statement about the issue:

The effort to ban books is in reality an effort to suppress knowledge. It always backfires; people who try to prevent learning are people who are afraid of freedom and complexity. RCC is delighted to present Mr. Spiegelman and to offer our community his insights and inspiration. Tennessee officials did Mr. Spiegelman an enormous favor and his books great credit despite trying to withhold his work from young minds — they managed to both entice those same impressionable readers and enrich Art Spiegelman — which is a great two-fer!”

Spiegelman has been a veteran of the comics world since the mid-1960s, some of his more notable work includes his run as co-editor alongside his wife Francoise Mouly of the comics magazine Raw from 1980 to 1991 where “Maus” was originally released in a serialized format. Maus would later be collected in the graphic novel format in two parts.

In “Maus,” Spiegelman relates the story of his parents while living in 1940s Poland and surviving the Holocaust as accounted by Spiegelman’s father. The book uses anthropomorphized animals for the groups involved in the story such as mice in place of Jewish people and cats as Nazis. The book would go on to win a Pulitzer Prize in 1992.

The controversy around the book was recently stoked due to a decision made by the McMinn County School Board in Tennessee to ban the book for “inappropriate language” and a depiction of nudity, according to the Associated Press.

The resulting ban has increased sales of the book recently taking spots in the top five sales rankings on Amazon’s Best Sellers list in the Graphic Novel category. The ban and the result of renewed interest in “Maus” has been attributed to the so-called Streisand Effect by media outlets such as CNBC.

The Streisand Effect posits that when an attempt to ban, hide, or censor information is made it has an unintended consequence of bringing attention and interest to the public. The Streisand Effect is named after noted singer/actress Barbara Streisand. 

Fairfax County has its own recent history involving attempts at banning books. In September, parents called for the banning of two books with LGBTQ content from high school libraries. The books, “Gender Queer: A Memoir” by Maia Kobabe and “Lawn Boy” by Jonathan Evison, were singled out alleging depictions of pedophilia. A review made by a school panel determined that the allegations were unwarranted and the books were allowed to return to the shelves of high school libraries.

Spiegelman’s “What the %@&*! Happened to Comics” will be held on Feb. 27 at Center Stage at the Reston Community Center at 2310 Colts Neck Road. Tickets for the event are officially sold out. 

Photo via Pengiun Random House

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Planning for new arts center at Reston Next begins

The county is officially courting feedback on the feasibility of a proposed arts center at Boston Properties’ Reston Next development.

Proffers negotiated by the county and the developer call for a 60,000-square-foot arts center and performing arts venue at the development.

Public meetings are planned from February through April to review the feasibility of the project. Architecture firm Grimm + Parker plans to review feedback and determine an estimate cost for the center.

“Community members, arts organizations and educators should plan to attend a session aligned with their perspective and give input regarding community needs and expectations for the facility space elements and functions,” Reston Community Center wrote in a Jan. 24 announcement about the public engagement period.

A breakdown of the meeting schedule is below:

Monday, February 14, 2022, 6:30 p.m. Kickoff Meeting. RCC Hunters Woods.

Monday, February 28, 2022, 6:30 p.m. Focus Group: Performing Arts. RCC Hunters Woods.

Monday, March 14, 2022, 6:30 p.m. Focus Group: Visual Arts. RCC Hunters Woods.

Monday, March 28, 2022, 6:30 p.m. Focus Group: Arts Education, Schools, Equity/Opportunity Neighborhoods. Zoom platform.

Monday, April 4, 2022, 6:30 p.m. General Wrap-up. Zoom platform.

Participants should RSVP by emailing [email protected]

Reston Next, formerly known as Reston Gateway, is located next to the Reston Town Center Metro Station. The development will be anchored by Volkswagen Group of America and Fannie Mae.

The arts center was part of a proffer agreement approved by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors in 2018. Block J, which is near the intersection of Sunset Hills Road and Town Center Parkway, is expected to house the facility.

A feasibility study must be completed by the summer of 2022.

Image via handout/Fairfax County Government

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Reston Community Center Hunters Woods (staff photo by David Taube)

The weekly planner is a roundup of interesting events over the next week in the Herndon and Reston area.

We’ve searched the web for events of note. Want to submit a listing? Submit your pitch here!

Monday, Jan. 24

  • Ice Skating — 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. at Reston Town Center — Students have the day off amid a professional development day for staff, but the ice skating pavilion will be open. Admission starts at $9 for seniors, military members and kids ages 12 and under.

Tuesday, Jan. 25

  • Hooray for Horses — 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Loudoun Heritage Farm Museum — Learn about horses, from breeds of work horses to grooming, and get a home activity bag. Cost is $5.

Wednesday, Jan. 26

  • Senior Movie Day — 10 a.m. at Bow Tie Cinemas at Reston Town Center — This special showing to audiences ages 55 and up presents the World War II film “Midway.” Doors open at 9:15 a.m. No registration required. Free.

Thursday, Jan. 27

  • An Evening with Branford Marsalis — 8 p.m. at The Barns — The Branford Marsalis Quarter, led by a saxophonist from the Marsalis jazz family, performs at Wolf Trap. Tickets start at $68, and doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Friday. Jan. 28

Saturday, Jan. 29

  • Reston Summer Camp Expo — 9 a.m. to noon at Reston Community Center Hunters Woods — Learn about Reston-area camps, win door prizes and enjoy hands-on games and crafts. Free.
  • Celebrate Lunar New Year with a Lion Dance Performance — Noon to 12:30 p.m. at Herndon Fortnightly Library — The Jow Ga Shaolin Institute, a traditional Chinese martial arts in Herndon, performs this tradition to bring good fortune in the new year.

Sunday, Jan. 30

  • Dino and Dragon Stroll — 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Dulles Expo Center — The final day of a weekend event featuring colossal animated dinosaurs and dragons. Cost is $21.99.
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Reston Community Center will move forward with a planned 37th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day with its 37th annual birthday celebration on Jan. 16 and 17.

After taking a hybrid approach last year, this year’s festivities will take place entirely in person at RCC Hunters Woods (2310 Colts Neck Road), but there will be some public health measures in place, as COVID-19 cases keep climbing in Fairfax County.

Like other Fairfax County public facilities, RCC continues to require that everyone wear a face mask when indoors, except when actively eating or drinking. Proof of a COVID-19 vaccination won’t be mandatory, but the organization “strongly urges” all attendees to be vaccinated and boosted, according to a news release.

In addition, the community lunch scheduled to follow a keynote speech by author and political commentator Heather McGhee on Jan. 17 will feature individual, contained meals, rather than a buffet as in past years.

The event also won’t include a planned live performance by the Reston Community Orchestra, which will instead make other to-be-announced arrangements for presenting its music, RCC says.

“We are carefully returning to a Reston Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration where we can come together as a community to honor Dr. King’s legacy,” RCC Board of Governors Chair Beverly Cosham said. “Now more than ever, it is important to ask ourselves ‘are we keeping the promise?’ We will remember the human rights for which Dr. King laid down his life and replenish our spirits with those who share the passion for justice that fuels the movement toward a truly free society.”

Tickets are required for the community lunch and keynote address. They cost $5 for Reston residents and employees, and $10 for other community members. They are available at the CenterStage Box Office or by calling 703-476-4500.

The full calendar of events is below: Read More

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Library books (Via Herndon Fortnightly Library)

The weekly planner is a roundup of interesting events over the next week in the Herndon and Reston area.

We’ve searched the web for events of note. Want to submit a listing? Submit your pitch here!

Monday, Jan. 3

Tuesday, Jan. 4

  • Weird, Wonderful History for Kids — 4:30-5:15 p.m. virtually — Find out about strange and bizarre facts about the origins of comic books. This teaching series for kids ages 6 through 12 relies on art, games, stories and skill-building exercises. Registration is required.

Wednesday, Jan. 5

  • Bilingual Hindi/English Storytime — 10:30-11 a.m. virtually — An event geared for kids ages 3 to 5 will feature songs, rhymes and stories in both Hindi and English. Registration required.

Thursday, Jan. 6

  • Lego Club — 4:30-5:30 p.m. at the Herndon Fortnightly Library — Use your imagination and problem-solving skills with other kids ages 5 and up to build Lego creations.
  • Open Mic — 7:30 p.m. at The Old Brogue — An event open to all, with sign-ups at 8 p.m.
  • Beer Pong — 10 p.m. at Sully’s Pour House — Compete in a tournament, without any entry fee, for a chance to win $100. Sign-ups at 9 p.m.

Friday, Jan. 7

  • Pinot’s Palette — 7-9:30 p.m — Enjoy a painting class with beer or wine. Cost is $45.

Saturday, Jan. 8

  • Winter Bird Count — 7 a.m. to noon starting at the Walker Nature Center — An annual bird count pairs beginners and experts together to get a pulse on wildlife in the area. Attendees can expect to get tips on identifying species. Register by Wednesday.

Sunday, Jan. 9

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Musician Akua Allrich (Courtesy)

Monday, Nov. 15

Tuesday, Nov. 16

  • “In Between: Phantom Algorithms Joining Worlds” (9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) — Check out a new art exhibit at Reston Community Center Lake Anne featuring the work of D.C.-based artist David Alexander and his two children. The art will be there through Nov. 28.

Wednesday, Nov. 17

  • Senior Movie Day (10 a.m.) — Watch “Harriet,” based on the life of abolitionist and Underground Railroad leader Harriet Tubman, in a free event for those ages 55 and up. Doors open at 9:15 a.m.

Thursday, Nov. 18

  • Embroidery 101 – Monograms (7-9 p.m.) — Nova Labs teaches a class on stitch lettering on terry cloth toweling with Pfaff single-thread sewing machines. Cost is $45.

Friday, Nov. 19

  • Fall Harvest Beer Pairing Dinner (6-8:30 p.m.) — A four course meal features Settle Down Easy Brewing Co. beers at the Hyatt Regency Dulles. Cost is $69 plus fees.

Saturday, Nov. 20

Sunday, Nov. 21

  • Reston Readings (5:30 p.m.) — Reston’s Used Book Shop presents its November showcase involving Kristin Ferragut, Courtney LeBlanc and Gregory Luce as well as open mic readers. Masks are required.

Photo via Google Maps

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Inside NextStop Theatre in Herndon (courtesy NextStop Theater Co.)

Monday, Nov. 8

Volunteering Group Holds Online Meet and Greet (6-6:45 p.m.) — The Junior League of Northern Virginia, a women’s organization passionate about volunteering, is holding a recruitment event on Zoom and sharing more about the difference it makes in the community.

Tuesday, Nov. 6

End of Year Financial Planning (1:30-3 p.m.) — Campbell Wealth Management discusses financial moves to make before Jan. 1. Free and taking place at Reston Association. Registration required.

Wednesday, Nov. 10

On the Brink of Change: Fairfax County, VA – c. 1960 (7-9 p.m.) — Hear the history of Fairfax County as it transitioned from its agricultural roots, 1960 desegregation between white and Black residents, and Reston founder Robert Simon’s vision for what the area has become today.

Thursday, Nov. 11

Smylin’ Jack at Jimmy’s Old Tavern (8 p.m.) — A group covering bands from AC/DC to Radiohead returns to Herndon.

Friday, Nov. 12

“Fully Committed” (8 p.m.) — A comedic play follows the struggles of an out-of-work actress. It’s the first performance of the NextStop Theatre Co. show’s run, which continues through Nov. 21. Cost is $25.

Saturday, Nov. 13

Meet the Artist Reception (10 a.m. to 5 p.m.) — Marthe McGrath meets with visitors at the Reston Art Gallery & Studios to share her acrylic and mixed media for her new show called “Kinetic Energy.”

Sunday. Nov. 14

“Judas and the Black Messiah” (3 p.m.) — The CenterStage presents the 2021 movie about the police killing of Black Panther Party leader Fred Hampton. Registration required. Free.

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Monday, Nov. 1

  • RCC Thanksgiving Food Drive (through Nov. 22) — Patrons, businesses and organizations can drop off non-perishable food and other items at various drop-off points throughout the community to benefit the social services nonprofit Cornerstones.

Tuesday, Nov. 2

  • Grades K-2 Makerclass (4:30-6 p.m., runs weekly through Dec. 14) — Kids will work on creative projects that make use of skills ranging from art to engineering and technology. There’s no class on Thanksgiving week. Presented by Nova Labs. Cost is $100.

Wednesday, Nov. 3

  • Reston Farmers Market (3-7 p.m.) — Stop by for some fresh produce at the parking lot of St. John Neumann Catholic Church.

Thursday, Nov. 4

  • Anna Balakerskaia (2:15-3:30 p.m.) — “Dr. Anna” will perform with her George Mason University students as well as Levine Music pianist Dasha Gabay. Free, but registration is required.

Friday, Nov. 5

  • “The Musical of Musicals (The Musical!)” (8 p.m.) — A satirical performance reminiscent of musical theater greats ranging from Andrew Lloyd Webber to Rodgers and Hammerstein kicks off at Reston Community Center’s CenterStage. Finale is 8 p.m. Saturday. Tickets cost $20 for adults, but discounts are available.

Saturday, Nov. 6

  • Appraisal Roadshow (11 a.m. to noon) — Have an expert appraise one of your personal items, from jewelry to coins and more, at the Reston Association headquarters. Private appointments with appraisers may be scheduled after the show, too. Cost starts at $15.

Sunday, Nov. 7

  • “The Turn of the Screw” (2 p.m.) — A finale gives audiences one last chance to attend, following performances on Friday and Saturday. Adapted from the classic Henry James horror story, this play follows the journey of a governess caring for two kids when she begins to wonder if the home is haunted. Tickets are $25.
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The nonprofit Virginia Recreation and Park Society recently recognized Reston’s multimillion-dollar pool renovation of the Terry L. Smith Aquatics Center along with community leader Bill Bouie.

The statewide group applauded the $5.5 million Reston pool project as the best new renovation of bricks and mortar projects in the state in 2020, and it presented Bouie with a Distinguished Volunteer Service award.

The organization handed out awards Tuesday in Harrisonburg during its annual conference.

Bouie, a telecommunications executive, coach, athlete and youth sports advocate, is the vice chair of the nine-member Reston Community Center board and has helped in key roles for the organization. He’s been with the RCC Board of Governors since 2003.

“No one has embodied Reston values more than Bill Bouie,” Leila Gordon, RCC executive director, said in a news release. “He gives and engenders respect; he believes in the power of each individual to contribute to the common good if they are given the tools to realize their potential. Bill makes us all better by showing us the example of someone who is a true servant leader and who loves building community.”

He was instrumental in advising RCC on a National Recreation and Park Association accreditation in 2020 and an enthusiastic participant in RCC’s “Equity Matters” film discussions created in response to the police murder of George Floyd on May 25, 2020 and renewed community focus on racial justice, the organization noted in a news release.

Bouie also serves as chair of the Fairfax County Park Authority Board, and he has served in leadership roles for the YMCA Fairfax County Reston, the Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts, Leadership Fairfax, Public Art Reston, and Reston Herndon Little League, among others.

Regarding the pool renovation, RCC board chair Beverly Cosham noted how patrons love the new pools, and she says the organization shares pride with its colleagues at Fairfax County Department of Public Works and Environmental Services who oversaw the project.

The RCC noted the pool project “replaced a 40-year-old pool and its aging infrastructure with two new, state-of-the-art pools: a 25-yard lap pool and a warm water exercise pool.” It opened in January 2020 after a year of construction.

RCC also noted the project included improvements for water- and electricity-savings, updated locker rooms, a new roof, recycling of materials and custom mosaic public art. And it was completed under budget, allowing more than $800,000 in unused contingencies to be returned to RCC’s reserves.

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The Washington West Film Festival returns for the 10th edition after postponing the event in 2020. (Photo courtesy Washington West Film Festival)

The 10th Washington West Film Festival is back in-person after being canceled in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

It will feature 31 films being shown from Thursday through Monday and expand its locations to include Bow Tie Cinemas in Reston Town Center, ShowPlace Icon in The Boro Tysons, Capital One Hall in Tysons Corner and CenterStage at the Reston Community Center.

The festival kicks off Thursday night with a single 7 p.m. showing of Wes Anderson’s “The French Dispatch” at ShowPlace Icon in the Boro Tysons.

Friday’s films will begin with two blocks of short films at Bow Tie Cinemas. The first block will feature six short films focused on family bonds and the second block will consist of seven shorts documenting the journeys of characters intentionally seeking something.

The remainder of Friday’s films will begin with a double feature block entitled “Making Your Mark,” with documentaries “Love Reaches Everywhere” and “The Shoulders of Giants.” A second double feature will follow about individuals pushing their physical and emotional boundaries with a showing of “Against the Current” and “Last Know Coordinates.”

Capping Friday’s films will be the narrative film “I’M FINE (THANKS FOR ASKING)” with the short film “Are You Okay?” preceding it.

Saturday will mark the official closing night of the festival. It will begin with a 75th anniversary screening of “It’s A Wonderful Life,” and will be followed by “Five Years North” and “A Crime on the Bayou.” The evening will be capped by the Washington, D.C., premiere of the documentary “Mission: Joy – Finding Happiness in Troubled Times” and will be preceded by the short film “Alone Together.”

While the festival will close Saturday, Sunday and Monday will also feature a handful of other films.

The ShowPlace Icon will host three blocks of films on Sunday. The blocks will begin with a student showcase of films from George Mason University’s FAVS (Film and Video Studies) student festival. The day will finish off with a reshowing of Friday’s film blocks about family bonds and followed by the documented journeys of characters intentionally seeking something.

The final film on Monday will be “The Blackest Battle,” written D.C. theatre artist Psalmayene 24.

Tickets are still available for purchase on the festival website.

All proceeds of the event will be donated to four charities: Evans Home for Children in Winchester, Baltimore non-profit Blueprint, foster program Virginia Kids Belong, and The Children’s Inn at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda.

The full lineup of film blocks with their times and locations is below:

Thursday, Oct. 21

  • 7 p.m. – “The French Dispatch,” at ShowPlace Icon in The Boro Tysons

Friday, Oct. 22

  • 5:30 p.m. – “Shorts Program One: Family Bonds,” at Bow Tie Cinemas in Reston Town Center
  • 6 p.m. – “Shorts Program Two: Seek and You Will Find,” at Bow Tie Cinemas in Reston Town Center
  • 7 p.m. – “Making Your Mark,” at Bow Tie Cinemas in Reston Town Center
  • 8 p.m. – “Beyond the Limits,” at Bow Tie Cinemas in Reston Town Center
  • 9 p.m. – Short film “Are You Okay?” precedes “I’M FINE (THANKS FOR ASKING),” at Bow Tie Cinemas in Reston Town Center

Saturday, Oct. 23

  • 10:30 a.m. – “It’s A Wonderful Life,” at Capital One Hall in Tysons Corner
  • 1:30 p.m. – “Five Years North,” at Capital One Hall in Tysons Corner
  • 4:30 p.m. – “A Crime on the Bayou,” at Capital One Hall in Tysons Corner
  • 7:30 p.m. – Short film “Alone Together” precedes “Mission: Joy – Finding Happiness in Troubled Times,” Capital One Hall in Tysons Corner

Sunday, Oct. 24

  • 1 p.m. – Showcase of “best of” films from George Mason University’s FAVS (Film and Video Studies) student festival, at ShowPlace Icon in The Boro Tysons
  • 1:30 p.m. – “Shorts Program One: Family Bonds,” at ShowPlace Icon in The Boro Tysons
  • 4 p.m. – “Shorts Program Two: Seek and You Will Find,” at ShowPlace Icon in The Boro Tysons

Monday, Oct. 25

  • 7:30 p.m. – “The Blackest Battle,” at CenterStage in Reston Community Center
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Lake Anne Plaza (Photo via vantagehill/Flickr)

Some residents at Lake Anne are turning to the county for help sort out its homeowner association’s contentious and divisive elections.

In a Sept. 23 letter to Hunter Mill District Supervisor Walter Alcorn, more than 40 residents urged the county to not allow the property’s landlord to vote in condominium elections. Roughly seven percent of votes in the board election is assigned to the unit occupied by Reston Community Center Lake Anne.

The letter contends that removing the landlord from the process — who holds about seven percent of the entire property — would allow the owners a chance for a “free” election.

“The county allowing the vote to be used in a condo election creates an unequal balance of power and potential conflict of interest,” the letter states. “Using taxpayer money to do so is not in the best interest of our community and especially unfair to our minority commercial owners, burdened with significant assessments; and who will be disproportionately affected by further special assessments to address our infrastructure issues.”

Board politics and infighting — including deep disagreement over the outcome of elections for board president — have mired the board for more than a year. Alcorn has met several times with concerned property owners and the Lake Anne of Reston Condominium Association to allay concerns about property management, lack of hot water, and other issues.

Alcorn told Reston Now that he deferred the proxy matter to RCC’s board for consideration.

“I have full confidence in that board — including the three members that were just re-elected by the community last month — to do the right thing,” he said.

RCC has no immediate plans to change participation in board elections. The center’s executive director Leila Gordon told Reston Now that RCC has had an excellent relationship with its landlord since 1999 when RCC Lake Anne first opened in the historic area.

Here’s more from Gordon on the issue:

The lease stipulates the proxy provision in the context of Section 7, “Leasehold Improvements,” and specifically notes that the Landlord’s proxy isn’t available when the matter is related to “voting on LARCA fees and assessments payable by Landlord.” RCC views the election of LARCA Board officers to be wholly unrelated to any issue of Tenant Improvements and entirely germane to issues of fees and assessments, and would therefore be the sole concern of the Landlord. We remain satisfied with the present arrangement.

Maintenance and infrastructure issues caught statewide attention when residents of the Quayside condominiums went without hot water for several months last winter.

An assessment by architecture firm Samaha Associates found that the property needs more than $37 million in repairs. At a mid-September meeting, Alcorn said the county may explore options to help revitalize the property. No formal plans have been proposed and discussions are ongoing.

Board President Jason Romano did not immediately return a request for comment from Reston Now.

LARCA’s board election for this year takes place on Oct. 27.

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The 2021 Preference Poll candidates for Reston Community Center’s Board of Governors are (left to right) Richard Stillson, Lisa Sechrest-Ehrhardt, and William G. Bouie (courtesy RCC)

With little fanfare, a trio of incumbents will resume their positions following an uncontested election for Reston Community Center’s Board of Governors.

Bill Bouie, who has served on the board since 2003, led the pack with 1,439 votes. He was followed by Lisa Sechrest-Ehrhardt, who has been on the board since 2012 and had 1,396 votes. Richard Stillson, who has been on the board since 2018, received 1,382.

They were selected through this year’s Preference Poll, which iso pen to all Small District 5 residents. The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors then formally appoints the selected winners after the poll.

This year was the first uncontested election in several years. Each individual will serve three-year terms that begin on Nov. 1.

Here’s more directly from RCC on the winners:

William G. Bouie has served on the RCC Board of Governors since 2003. He is also chairman of the Fairfax County Park Authority Board. Mr. Bouie is a telecommunications executive who is a passionate advocate for Reston and Fairfax County youth and adult sports and recreation opportunities. He has also served on the boards of the Wolf Trap Foundation, Public Art Reston, Fairfax County YMCA Reston and Reston Youth Baseball.

Lisa Sechrest-Ehrhardt is a 46-year resident of Reston and an RCC Board of Governors member since 2012. A social worker, she is committed to diversity, equity and inclusion, and she seeks to use her professional and personal experience to contribute to the social, cultural and educational environments provided by RCC.

Richard Stillson has served on the RCC Board of Governors since 2018. He has lived in Reston for 49 years. Mr. Stillson has been involved in Reston organizations since the community’s early days, including Reston 2020 and the first Reston Comprehensive Plan Task Force.

The board is responsible for strategic planning, policy administration, and community relations, among other areas.

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Monday, October 4

  • “Judy” (10 a.m.) — Reston Community Center Hunters Woods’ CenterStage gives a free showing of the 2019 biographical drama about “The Wizard of Oz” star Judy Garland.

Tuesday, October 5

  • Aspen Trees at Sunrise (6:30-8:30 p.m.) — Check out a Pinot’s Palette wine-and-painting class. Cost is $39.

Wednesday, October 6

  • Reston Farmers Market (3-7 p.m.) — Stop by for some fresh produce at the parking lot of St. John Neumann Catholic Church.

Thursday, October 7

Friday, October 8

  • “A Familiar Melody” (8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday as well as 2 p.m. on Sunday) — A NextStop Theatre Company show brings together a selection of Broadway hits. Tickets are $30.

Saturday, October 9

  • Community Yard Sale (8:30 a.m. to noon) — Eighty families are again filling the Reston Association headquarters’ parking lot.
  • Reston Baby Expo (9 a.m. to noon) — Find out about local organizations and resources focused on babies at this Reston Community Center Hunters Woods event that features workshops, educational sessions and more.
  • Miles for Migraine (9 a.m.) — Help support this nonprofit working to address this neurological condition, advance research and end stigma. Virtual venue as well as an in-person event at Lake Fairfax Park.

Sunday, October 10

  • Bird Walks (7:30-10:30 a.m.) — Beginner birders will gather to spot winged friends at Bright Pond.
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2018 Reston Multicultural Festival (Photos courtesy Reston Community Center)

Monday, September 20

  • Technology Help (4-6 p.m.) — Volunteers at Reston Regional Library are available to answer questions about technology. Half-hour slots are open for reservations.

Tuesday, September 21

  • (un)disclosed — It’s the last day to enjoy this exhibit, which features the work of Judith Pratt. Visitors can drop by until 5 p.m. at the Tephra Institute of Contemporary Art.

Thursday, September 23

  • Putting the Animals to Bed (6:30 p.m.) — Learn how Frying Pan Farm Park staff put the animals to bed. Bring a flashlight or lantern for this twilight tour. The cost is $10 per person.
  • Girl Power Book Club (7-8 p.m.) — The book club is celebrating its third anniversary this month by returning to in-person meetings. Middle-grade and young adult readers are invited. This month’s book is The Dire Days of Willoweep Manor.

Friday, September 24

  • Friday Night Live! (6:30 p.m.) — This free outdoor concert series returns this Friday. This week’s show features Screaming Monkeys.

Saturday, September 25

  • Reston Multicultural Festival — The annual festival is back at Lake Anne Plaza after a hiatus last year. The festival will include entertainment, shopping, and food.
  • Storytime (11 a.m.) –Laura Renauld reads from her Woodland Friends series at Scrawl Books in Reston Town Center.

Sunday, September 26

  • NatureFest (1-5 p.m.) — This family friend event features animals, plans and insects that live in Runnymede Park. Attendees can move between different natural stations. Free parking is available at the Herndon Police Department.
  • Talladega Nights (7 p.m.) — Enjoy a free screening and popcorn at Reston Metro Plaza. The movie starts at sundown.
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