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by Jennifer van der Kleut — November 16, 2016 at 12:10 pm 6 Comments

New Wolf Trap Bus Stop in Progress/Courtesy Fairfax Co. Fire & RescueA nearby stretch of road is getting a much-needed covered bus stop, thanks to volunteers from the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department and donations by local organizations.

Capt. Gery Morrison and his colleagues from Fire Station 42 (Wolf Trap) said the spot directly across from the firehouse, at Beulah Road and Route 7, has needed a covered bus stop for some time to help shelter people from inclement weather as they wait.

“The current stop is just a posted sign that sits in a ditch along the heavily traveled corridor of Route 7,” Capt. Rocco Alvaro said in a blog post yesterday. “Area residents line up in the morning without adequate shelter and are forced to take their chances waiting on the edge of Route 7 for the next scheduled bus.”

Morrison and several of his crew members decided they would build a community bus stop, but only if they could get donations.

Reston’s Home Depot and The Barns at Wolf Trap then agreed to donate materials, which Fire Station 42 members used to build a covered stop.

Although the initial structure is complete, some finishing touches are still in the works.

“When finished, the project will bring some of the finer touches of the Wolftrap Firehouse into the soon-to-be-completed bus stop,” Alvaro said.

The captain said he hopes more collaborative projects are in the community’s future.

“What an innovative way to develop community partnerships while at the same time enhancing the safety and well-being of our community members,” he said.

Photo via Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department

by Karen Goff — April 4, 2016 at 10:00 am 3 Comments

Bus relocatiion 1

Due to station improvement work at the Reston Town Center Transit Station, bus stops will be temporarily relocated to Bluemont Way.

During Phase 1 (Monday, April 4 – Wednesday, April 27), Route 605, 950, RIBS 1, and RIBS 4 will be relocated.

During Phase 2 (Thursday, April 28 – Friday, May 20), Route 505, RIBS 2, RIBS 3, and RIBS 5 will be relocated.

The Connector Store will remain open during construction.

 

Visit Fairfax County Connector online to see more information about the Reston Transit Center and bus routes.

by Karen Goff — July 23, 2014 at 3:00 pm 0

Classic Reston banner

Classic Reston is a biweekly feature sponsored by the Greater Reston Chamber of Commerce that highlights businesses, places and people with deep roots in Reston.

It’s a big week for Reston with Saturday’s opening of its first Silver Line Metro stop.

Metrorail will connect Reston in a straight shot with Washington, D.C., making the community an attractive option for both residents who work in Arlington or D.C. and workers in Reston who live to the East.

This week’s Classic Reston takes a look at he community’s quirky public transportation link of the 1970s.

When Reston was founded, the “Live, Work and Play,” motto was in place, but in reality, the “work” part was a work in progress. Most Restonians worked in D.C., and it was a long commute with no Dulles Toll Road or Orange Line Metro to Vienna.

But Restonians saw the need for a commuter transit, so — in the true pioneer spirit of the place — they founded a service themselves.  In the early 1970s, the Reston Community Association (RCA) and Reston developers Gulf Reston, created the Reston Community Bus Service (RCBS).

Riding the Reston Commuter bus in the 1970s/Credit: GMU Some in Reston nicknamed the bus “the booze bus,” since there were free-flowing drinks onboard. Well, it was a long commute.

The drinks dried up in 1972 after a commuter threatened to complain to the Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control Board.

“We will inform our riders they are confined to Coke and potato chips unless we hear otherwise,” Reston Commuter Bus officer Howard Pearlstein told an Associated Press reporter in February of 1972.

The shuttle to D.C. lasted a few years, dying out by the late 1970s. Eventually, Reston minister Embry Rucker helped start the Reston Internal Bus System (RIBS), which took people to various parts of the growing community.

After that, if you wanted to get into D.C., you were on your own — until now.

Reston’s new era begins at noon on Saturday, when the first train pulls out of Wiehle-Reston East heading toward Tysons Corner, Arlington and Washington. Find schedules and fare information on Silverlinemetro.com.

And remember, no eating or drinking on Metro — and certainly no cocktails.

Photo: Riding Reston’s Commuter Bus in the 1970s/Credit: GMU Archives

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